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Redcurrant jam recipe

Redcurrant jam recipe


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  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Preserves
  • Jam

Redcurrants are fabulous for jam making and when fully ripe have the highest pectin content. This is a great jam for using as a base for numerous sauces and also wonderful over vanilla ice cream!


Hampshire, England, UK

506 people made this

IngredientsMakes: 4 jars redcurrant jam

  • 1.35kg redcurrants
  • 600ml water
  • 1.8kg granulated sugar

MethodPrep:20min ›Cook:30min ›Extra time:8hr setting › Ready in:8hr50min

  1. Wash the redcurrants and remove any stalks. Combine the redcurrants and the water in a preserving pan and cook over a low-medium heat, mashing occasionally, until the fruit is soft and breaking apart, about 30 to 45 minutes.
  2. Add the sugar and bring the jam to the boil. Begin testing for the setting point by placing a small drop of jam onto a cold plate. If it sets and wrinkles when you push it with your finger, it is ready.
  3. Transfer to sterilised jam jars and seal immediately. Leave undisturbed in a cool, dark place for 8 hours to achieve a good set.

How to sterilise jars

Learn how to sterilise jars two ways with our handy step-by-step guide and video.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(4)

Reviews in English (4)

Do you really need so much sugar!!!! As it's Home made you reduce this by loads. The bitter tang is what Red currents are!-08 Jul 2014

Great recipe. I love red currants! I generally make Redcurrant Jelly so this is a lovely change. So many red currants this year....I did change the instructions very slightly, I simmered the currants for between 25 - 35 minutes and used a potato masher to help the breaking down of the fruit. ( I made 3 batches)I also made a small batch mixing red currants with some gooseberries and raspberries.-13 Aug 2013

Simmered for 30 min that was enough-10 Dec 2013


Red Currant Jam

With only four ingredients and in only fifteen minutes you&rsquoll be on your way to the best Red Currant Jam you&rsquove ever tasted with this simple recipe!

I&rsquom kicking off the recipes of Red Currant Week with a basic, yet incredibly delicious Red Currant Jam. When I began looking for recipes to make for #RedCurrantWeek, I found many jam recipes that seemed very complicated with many steps and used gelatin. I wanted to make something simple yet had a distinct currant flavor and kept its tartness.

I scored big on all those things with this recipe from David Lebovitz. I urge you to click over to his post and read the story behind this recipe and you&rsquoll understand why I chose it. This Red Currant Jam has been made this way for decades and I knew this recipe would be a winner!

I added the lemon zest to his original recipe, but if you don&rsquot have any that&rsquos okay too. I just really love lemon and fruit together because the lemon just adds brightness and acidity that brings out the flavor of the berries.

Unlike David&rsquos recipe, I didn&rsquot have a food mill but found that using a food processor and a wire/mesh strainer worked just as well. You&rsquoll also need a food scale for this recipe since it&rsquos necessary to weigh the sugar before adding it to the berries.

My family absolutely loves this recipe on any bread product they can get their hands on. I particularly love it with a fresh croissant smeared with butter then Red Currant Jam. I&rsquom pretty certain that&rsquos my daughter&rsquos favorite way to eat it too because she devoured my prop croissant after this photoshoot!

If you missed yesterday&rsquos post on the History of Red Currants and why I&rsquom currently obsessed with them&hellip you can check it out here!

Follow along on social media with hashtag #RedCurrantWeek and share with me your favorite red currant recipes!


Red Currant Jam

Before I can even begin to regale you with stories about how spectacular this jam is, I need to make one thing perfectly clear: No, I was not born yesterday, and, yes, I totally realize currants are no longer in season and that for many — if not all of you — the fact that I am posting a recipe for something you’ll have to wait til next year to make, is confusing, if not annoying. So, apologies in advance, but here’s the thing: I’m basically obsessed with this jam. Yes, I eat it straight out of the jar, by the spoonful, double dipping on occasion, with a side of peanut butter, if you must know. And because I have pounds of frozen currants in my freezer, I’ve been making kind of a lot of it, which is, of course, contributing to the difficulty I’m having containing my excitement. I just can’t wait til next year to write about all this deliciousness. I’ve got to tell you now.

I love this jam for a lot of reasons. I love how tart it is. I love how sweet it it. I love it’s deep currant-y flavor and color. And I love (almost more than anything else) how easy it is to make. Truth be told, not only is this the first time I have ever made jam, but it is the first time i have ever even wanted to make jam. I’m just not the canning, jarring and pickling type. (I assuming this is not coming as a shock to any of you who have spent even an iota of time on this site.) Bottom line: I’d rather put my berries in a pie — preferably a fried one that fits in your hand, than make jam. But the copious amount of currants that ended up in my freezer last month got me thinking, uncharacteristically, about jam.

You only need two ingredients to make red currant jam (sugar and currants — Martha Stewart does add lemon, and David Lebovitz adds water, but neither is necessary), you don’t need pectin (or any other gelling agent), you do need a food mill (although you could puree the cooked currants in the blender and then strain them in a sieve), sterilizing jars, etc., is unnecessary, and the whole process takes almost no time. Bottom line. End of story. That’s it. And I have to say the magic/science that takes place when something downright drinkable (ie: the cooked currant/sugar puree) becomes downright spoonable, is pretty special. I see lots of currant jam making in my future and yours too — if you can just be patient, as your future, sadly, looks an awful lot like next summer. Apologies, again, for that.


Recipe Summary

  • 4 pounds fresh red currants
  • 1 cup water
  • 7 cups white sugar
  • 4 fluid ounces liquid fruit pectin

Place the currants into a large pot, and crush with a potato masher or berry crusher if you have one. Pour in 1 cup of water, and bring to a boil. Simmer for 10 minutes. Strain the fruit through a jelly cloth or cheese cloth, and measure out 5 cups of the juice.

Pour the juice into a large saucepan, and stir in the sugar. Bring to a rapid boil over high heat, and stir in the liquid pectin immediately. Return to a full rolling boil, and allow to boil for 30 seconds.

Remove from heat and skim off foam from the top. Ladle or pour into sterile 1/2 pint jars, filling to within 1/2 inch of the top. Wipe the rims with a clean damp cloth. Cover with new sterile lids and rings. Process covered in a bath of simmering water for 10 minutes or the time recommended by your local extension for your area.


Procedure

For the best flavor, choose berries which are at their peak of color. Place approximately 8 cups of red currants into a large kettle. Add &#xBD cup of water and bring to a boil. Allow fruit to simmer for 10 to 15 minutes, or until softened. Crush boiled fruits with a potato masher and then stir in 4 cups of sugar. Bring the mixture to a full rolling boil over high heat. Quickly stir in 2 oz. of liquid fruit pectin. Stirring continuously, allow the jam to return to a rapid boil. Cook over high heat for 30 seconds. Remove the pan from the stove and skim any foam from the top.


Additional Information

Wash berries gently in small batches in a colander under cool running water to make sure you remove all dirt and grit and to avoid bruising the soft fruit.

Place a clean towel on your work surface to absorb water from the hot jars as you take them out of the water bath (boiling-water) canner to be filled, and again once the jars are processed. The towel prevents hot jars from coming into contact with cooler countertops. Significant temperature differences can cause jar breakage.

For long-boil soft spreads that do not use added pectin, use three parts fruit that is fully ripe to one part fruit that is slightly under-ripe. Under-ripe fruit generally has a higher pectin content, which helps these spreads form a gel.

When making long-boil jams, it is essential to maintain a close vigil on the boiling fruit mixture. As the spread thickens, it tends to stick to the pan and can easily burn if it is not stirred frequently and thoroughly. Using a heavy-bottomed, good-quality saucepan also help to prevent scorching.

If you are canning above 1,000 feet sea level, see Canning Altitude Adjustments to find how much additional processing time is needed.

See Canning & Preserving Glossary for a description of terms used in this recipe.

Before canning each season, review canning procedures. See Canning & Preserving Basics to refresh your memory with the procedures.


How to Use Red Currant Jelly

Red Currants are bursting with such tangy flavor, they pair perfectly with anything from venison to English muffins. Of course spreading this jelly on your morning toast is the easiest way to enjoy this tart treat. But it can be used for so much more! Try it with lamb, roast chicken, or turkey as you would a classic cranberry sauce . Charcuterie boards are another great way to enjoy this jelly – it’s a delicious accompaniment to your smokey meats and cheeses.

If you’re looking for the sweeter side of this delectable jelly, it’s great for English muffins, scones, pound cake, coffee cake, or used as a filling in pastries, pop tarts, and muffins. Mix it in yogurt, use it to flavor cake frostings, use it in English trifles, layer cakes, thumbprint cookies, Linzer Kekse, and more. One of of the many ways I like to eat this red currant jelly is by spreading it on my homemade English Crumpets – it’s SO good!


Additional Information

* If your mixture has not reached the gel stage when first tested, return the pan to medium-high heat and cook, stirring constantly, for an additional 5 minutes. Repeat gel stage test and cooking as needed.

** To zest the lemon for this recipe, use a vegetable peeler to remove the yellow part of the peel in one long strip.

For long-boil soft spreads that do not use added pectin, use three parts fruit that is fully ripe to one part fruit that is slightly under-ripe. Under-ripe fruit generally has a higher pectin content, which helps these spreads form a gel.

When making long-boil jams, it is essential to maintain a close vigil on the boiling fruit mixture. As the spread thickens, it tends to stick to the pan and can easily burn if it is not stirred frequently and thoroughly. Using a heavy-bottomed, good-quality saucepan also help to prevent scorching.

If you are canning above 1,000 feet sea level, see Canning Altitude Adjustments to find how much additional processing time is needed.

See Canning & Preserving Glossary for a description of terms used in this recipe.

Before canning each season, review canning procedures. See Canning & Preserving Basics to refresh your memory with the procedures.


Who is The VegHog?

The VegHog Denmark A vegetarian hobby cook and urban gardener born in Finland, currently living in Denmark. I try to develop my cooking skills by making a wide variety of veggie dishes, some of them traditional and some new creations. My favourites include veggie burgers, squashes, organic and local produce, cider, spelt, rye, pizzas, pasta dishes, risottos and sea-buckthorn. Follow theveghog on Instagram and @TheVegHog on Twitter! View my complete profile

Gardening with Children

We were at the allotment at the weekend and Jemima, being a lover of all fruits, was going round asking which berries she was allowed to pick. She set about the redcurrant bush and before I knew it she’d filled a tub full of red currants…and along with the red ones there were green ones and all shades in between.

On the whole they were not quite ripe enough to pick but Jemima’s enthusiasm was hard to contain. We also don’t net our fruit for fear of trapping birds and if we had left them on the bushes for longer a lot would probably have been eaten.

So I took my large tub of under ripe redcurrants home and put them on a window sill, with the lid loosely fitted and left them for a couple of days. Hey presto! They all ripened beautifully and so I will probably pick them early again next year.

For super speedy berry picking why not try the handy Berry Picker. Available in two sizes it allows you to harvest the fruit up to ten times faster than usual.

I decided to make some redcurrant jam with my bumper harvest. It was so easy to make and extremely delicious.


To make currant juice, weigh your red currants. For each pound of currants, you will need 1/2 cup water. Combine the currants and water in a large saucepan and simmer over low heat for 30 minutes, mashing the currants a bit. Then drain the fruit and juice through a damp jelly bag for 6 to 8 hours.

Prepare a water-bath canning pot and two 8-oz jam jars (or 4 4-oz jars). Place a small saucer in the freezer.

Combine the red currant juice and sugar in a large, wide saucepan and bring the mixture to a boil, stirring to dissolve the sugar.

Turn heat down to medium and boil the mixture until it reaches 220 degrees, stirring frequently to prevent scorching and skimming off any foam or skin that accumulates.

Remove the saucepan with the jelly from the heat and skim off any foam or impurities.

Ladle the jelly into the prepared jars, leaving ¼ inch headspace. Bubble the jars and wipe down the rims.

Process the jars in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes. Allow to cool 5 minutes before removing the jars from the water bath.

Cool jars on a counter. Check the seals and store in a cool, dark place for up to one year.