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From Grub Street: Where To Eat, Drink, & Be Merry On XMAS Eve/Day & New Year's Eve/Day


Hey all of you procrastinators! Good ol' Grub Street has come to your rescue, again: check out their last-minute list of NYC's best spots to eat, drink, and be merry on Christmas Eve/Day and New Year's Eve/Day.

~

Read it & eat...and you're welcome, in advance!

The Lunch Belle


Buon Natale (Merry Christmas)

Christmas in Italy has many traditions, and as one could expect, many of them revolve around food. Fish is usually the main course for Christmas Eve and meat is served on Christmas Day. Midnight mass is very popular with many families, who afterwards return home for a glass of spumante or prosecco and the opening of presents from Babbo Natale (Father Christmas/Santa Claus).

The Christmas day meal will likely last for hours, starting with seafood dishes, cured meat and olives the primi might be tortellini in broth or lasagna or pasticcio (baked pasta), then roast meat or chicken. The main meal is usually followed by pandoro (a traditional Veronese yeast sweet bread) and panettone, chocolate or homemade cookies.

Babbo Natale is gaining popularity in Italy, as is gift giving during the holiday season. In that spirit, here are some gift ideas to help you have an “Italian” holiday season.

Food & Drink

M’tucci’s Provisions has created three holiday cookie boxes and two types of house-made panettone. Details and ordering information are listed just below.

Of course, who wouldn’t love getting a gift certificate from M’tucci’s?

LaMarca Prosecco is perfect for holiday cocktail parties. At the moment, I’m really enjoying a red from Southern Italy, Appassimento by Bonari and Il Bruciato, Guada al Tasso from Antinori from Tuscany. Il Bruciato is on the wine list at M’tucci’s Italian and you can find both locally in wine shops. Splurge on that special someone and buy them a bottle of Brunello di Montalcino, a Barolo, or one of the Super Tuscans, such as Sassicaia or Tignanello. The liquid gift that won’t disappear during one dinner is an Amaro. One of the best being Quintessentia Amaro Nonino. There are cheaper Amari, but this one is well worth the extra money, with the perfect balance of herbal, sweet and bitter.

Tully’s Deli on San Mateo has a very good selection of dried pasta by DeCecco, canned tomatoes, and very good extra virgin olive oils/EVOO (the best selection I have seen in ABQ).

If it’s cured meat you want, definitely go to Molinari’s website (this San Francisco institution probably makes the best commercial U.S. salami you can buy).

Eataly has a good website with a large assortment of EVOO, truffle products, and gift baskets.

After my first trip to Italy, I was hooked on cappuccino. Upon returning, I bought an entry level espresso machine, but quickly outgrew it. I upgraded to a well-known Italian brand, Gaggia, and have been using their burr grinder (necessary for great espresso) and the Gaggia Classic for many years. You won’t find them locally, but the website Whole Latte Love has everything you will need for great espresso and cappuccino at home. I regularly buy the Hermes Espresso Blend from Red Rock Roasters and occasionally splurge on one of the espresso blends from Cutbow Coffee.

Coffee Table Books

Since I used to shoot assignments for National Geographic, I’m a bit biased when it comes to recommending photo books on Italy. A few stand out:

“Rome: Eternal City: Rome in the Photographs Collection of the Royal Institute of British Architects” - published this year

“National Geographic Inside the Vatican” by James Stanfield

“One Hundred & One Beautiful Small Towns in Italy” (Rizzoli Classics)

“Italy Seen through Magnum's Lens: From Henri Cartier-Bresson to Paolo Pellegrin”

Recipes, Food & Drink

If you only had one Italian cookbook, it should be “Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking” by Marcella Hazan. As the title says, it is essential. I’m not that big of a fan of Ina, Giada or Lidia, so I don’t mention their books here:

“The Mozza Cookbook: Recipes from Los Angeles's Favorite Italian Restaurant and Pizzeria” by Nancy Silverton

“Amaro: The Spirited World of Bittersweet, Herbal Liqueurs, with Cocktails, Recipes, and Formulas”

“Red, White, and Greens: The Italian Way with Vegetables” by Faith Willinger

“Italian Wines” by Gambero Rosso - An annual guide to the best of Italy.

“Treasures of the Italian Table” by Burton Anderson - one of my favorites. Hard to find and a bit expensive, but worth every penny.

Travel & Food (some with recipes)

“Pasta, Pane, Vino: Deep Travels Through Italy’s Food Culture” by Matt Goulding - great stories of traveling, eating and cooking from Piedmont to Sicily. The chapter about taking pizzaioli classes in Naples is great.

“Tasting Italy” by National Geographic & America’s Test Kitchen - Beautiful photos and really good recipes. My copy has red wine stains on some pages.

“See You in the Piazza” by Frances Mayes - she cares a little more about churches and Italian architecture than I do, but this is a terrific book for discovering the small towns in Italy, Sicily and Sardinia. The meals and recipes are worth the price!

Photo Tour/Workshops

Want to give a really special gift? One of my colleagues is offering a Photography Workshop in Italy next year. Not only will you get photography tips from world-class photographers, but you’ll eat and drink well, too.

Read about the workshop and contact Catherine Karnow here: http://catherinekarnowphotoworkshop.com/home

Photos from Italy

Only for M’tucci’s guests and for a limited time, the prints below are on sale for the holidays. They are printed on 13” x 19” Luster Paper with archival ink with an approximate 1” border. Click on the photo to see it large. Each print is signed and is $150. Please contact me, Michael Lewis: [email protected]


Buon Natale (Merry Christmas)

Christmas in Italy has many traditions, and as one could expect, many of them revolve around food. Fish is usually the main course for Christmas Eve and meat is served on Christmas Day. Midnight mass is very popular with many families, who afterwards return home for a glass of spumante or prosecco and the opening of presents from Babbo Natale (Father Christmas/Santa Claus).

The Christmas day meal will likely last for hours, starting with seafood dishes, cured meat and olives the primi might be tortellini in broth or lasagna or pasticcio (baked pasta), then roast meat or chicken. The main meal is usually followed by pandoro (a traditional Veronese yeast sweet bread) and panettone, chocolate or homemade cookies.

Babbo Natale is gaining popularity in Italy, as is gift giving during the holiday season. In that spirit, here are some gift ideas to help you have an “Italian” holiday season.

Food & Drink

M’tucci’s Provisions has created three holiday cookie boxes and two types of house-made panettone. Details and ordering information are listed just below.

Of course, who wouldn’t love getting a gift certificate from M’tucci’s?

LaMarca Prosecco is perfect for holiday cocktail parties. At the moment, I’m really enjoying a red from Southern Italy, Appassimento by Bonari and Il Bruciato, Guada al Tasso from Antinori from Tuscany. Il Bruciato is on the wine list at M’tucci’s Italian and you can find both locally in wine shops. Splurge on that special someone and buy them a bottle of Brunello di Montalcino, a Barolo, or one of the Super Tuscans, such as Sassicaia or Tignanello. The liquid gift that won’t disappear during one dinner is an Amaro. One of the best being Quintessentia Amaro Nonino. There are cheaper Amari, but this one is well worth the extra money, with the perfect balance of herbal, sweet and bitter.

Tully’s Deli on San Mateo has a very good selection of dried pasta by DeCecco, canned tomatoes, and very good extra virgin olive oils/EVOO (the best selection I have seen in ABQ).

If it’s cured meat you want, definitely go to Molinari’s website (this San Francisco institution probably makes the best commercial U.S. salami you can buy).

Eataly has a good website with a large assortment of EVOO, truffle products, and gift baskets.

After my first trip to Italy, I was hooked on cappuccino. Upon returning, I bought an entry level espresso machine, but quickly outgrew it. I upgraded to a well-known Italian brand, Gaggia, and have been using their burr grinder (necessary for great espresso) and the Gaggia Classic for many years. You won’t find them locally, but the website Whole Latte Love has everything you will need for great espresso and cappuccino at home. I regularly buy the Hermes Espresso Blend from Red Rock Roasters and occasionally splurge on one of the espresso blends from Cutbow Coffee.

Coffee Table Books

Since I used to shoot assignments for National Geographic, I’m a bit biased when it comes to recommending photo books on Italy. A few stand out:

“Rome: Eternal City: Rome in the Photographs Collection of the Royal Institute of British Architects” - published this year

“National Geographic Inside the Vatican” by James Stanfield

“One Hundred & One Beautiful Small Towns in Italy” (Rizzoli Classics)

“Italy Seen through Magnum's Lens: From Henri Cartier-Bresson to Paolo Pellegrin”

Recipes, Food & Drink

If you only had one Italian cookbook, it should be “Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking” by Marcella Hazan. As the title says, it is essential. I’m not that big of a fan of Ina, Giada or Lidia, so I don’t mention their books here:

“The Mozza Cookbook: Recipes from Los Angeles's Favorite Italian Restaurant and Pizzeria” by Nancy Silverton

“Amaro: The Spirited World of Bittersweet, Herbal Liqueurs, with Cocktails, Recipes, and Formulas”

“Red, White, and Greens: The Italian Way with Vegetables” by Faith Willinger

“Italian Wines” by Gambero Rosso - An annual guide to the best of Italy.

“Treasures of the Italian Table” by Burton Anderson - one of my favorites. Hard to find and a bit expensive, but worth every penny.

Travel & Food (some with recipes)

“Pasta, Pane, Vino: Deep Travels Through Italy’s Food Culture” by Matt Goulding - great stories of traveling, eating and cooking from Piedmont to Sicily. The chapter about taking pizzaioli classes in Naples is great.

“Tasting Italy” by National Geographic & America’s Test Kitchen - Beautiful photos and really good recipes. My copy has red wine stains on some pages.

“See You in the Piazza” by Frances Mayes - she cares a little more about churches and Italian architecture than I do, but this is a terrific book for discovering the small towns in Italy, Sicily and Sardinia. The meals and recipes are worth the price!

Photo Tour/Workshops

Want to give a really special gift? One of my colleagues is offering a Photography Workshop in Italy next year. Not only will you get photography tips from world-class photographers, but you’ll eat and drink well, too.

Read about the workshop and contact Catherine Karnow here: http://catherinekarnowphotoworkshop.com/home

Photos from Italy

Only for M’tucci’s guests and for a limited time, the prints below are on sale for the holidays. They are printed on 13” x 19” Luster Paper with archival ink with an approximate 1” border. Click on the photo to see it large. Each print is signed and is $150. Please contact me, Michael Lewis: [email protected]


Buon Natale (Merry Christmas)

Christmas in Italy has many traditions, and as one could expect, many of them revolve around food. Fish is usually the main course for Christmas Eve and meat is served on Christmas Day. Midnight mass is very popular with many families, who afterwards return home for a glass of spumante or prosecco and the opening of presents from Babbo Natale (Father Christmas/Santa Claus).

The Christmas day meal will likely last for hours, starting with seafood dishes, cured meat and olives the primi might be tortellini in broth or lasagna or pasticcio (baked pasta), then roast meat or chicken. The main meal is usually followed by pandoro (a traditional Veronese yeast sweet bread) and panettone, chocolate or homemade cookies.

Babbo Natale is gaining popularity in Italy, as is gift giving during the holiday season. In that spirit, here are some gift ideas to help you have an “Italian” holiday season.

Food & Drink

M’tucci’s Provisions has created three holiday cookie boxes and two types of house-made panettone. Details and ordering information are listed just below.

Of course, who wouldn’t love getting a gift certificate from M’tucci’s?

LaMarca Prosecco is perfect for holiday cocktail parties. At the moment, I’m really enjoying a red from Southern Italy, Appassimento by Bonari and Il Bruciato, Guada al Tasso from Antinori from Tuscany. Il Bruciato is on the wine list at M’tucci’s Italian and you can find both locally in wine shops. Splurge on that special someone and buy them a bottle of Brunello di Montalcino, a Barolo, or one of the Super Tuscans, such as Sassicaia or Tignanello. The liquid gift that won’t disappear during one dinner is an Amaro. One of the best being Quintessentia Amaro Nonino. There are cheaper Amari, but this one is well worth the extra money, with the perfect balance of herbal, sweet and bitter.

Tully’s Deli on San Mateo has a very good selection of dried pasta by DeCecco, canned tomatoes, and very good extra virgin olive oils/EVOO (the best selection I have seen in ABQ).

If it’s cured meat you want, definitely go to Molinari’s website (this San Francisco institution probably makes the best commercial U.S. salami you can buy).

Eataly has a good website with a large assortment of EVOO, truffle products, and gift baskets.

After my first trip to Italy, I was hooked on cappuccino. Upon returning, I bought an entry level espresso machine, but quickly outgrew it. I upgraded to a well-known Italian brand, Gaggia, and have been using their burr grinder (necessary for great espresso) and the Gaggia Classic for many years. You won’t find them locally, but the website Whole Latte Love has everything you will need for great espresso and cappuccino at home. I regularly buy the Hermes Espresso Blend from Red Rock Roasters and occasionally splurge on one of the espresso blends from Cutbow Coffee.

Coffee Table Books

Since I used to shoot assignments for National Geographic, I’m a bit biased when it comes to recommending photo books on Italy. A few stand out:

“Rome: Eternal City: Rome in the Photographs Collection of the Royal Institute of British Architects” - published this year

“National Geographic Inside the Vatican” by James Stanfield

“One Hundred & One Beautiful Small Towns in Italy” (Rizzoli Classics)

“Italy Seen through Magnum's Lens: From Henri Cartier-Bresson to Paolo Pellegrin”

Recipes, Food & Drink

If you only had one Italian cookbook, it should be “Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking” by Marcella Hazan. As the title says, it is essential. I’m not that big of a fan of Ina, Giada or Lidia, so I don’t mention their books here:

“The Mozza Cookbook: Recipes from Los Angeles's Favorite Italian Restaurant and Pizzeria” by Nancy Silverton

“Amaro: The Spirited World of Bittersweet, Herbal Liqueurs, with Cocktails, Recipes, and Formulas”

“Red, White, and Greens: The Italian Way with Vegetables” by Faith Willinger

“Italian Wines” by Gambero Rosso - An annual guide to the best of Italy.

“Treasures of the Italian Table” by Burton Anderson - one of my favorites. Hard to find and a bit expensive, but worth every penny.

Travel & Food (some with recipes)

“Pasta, Pane, Vino: Deep Travels Through Italy’s Food Culture” by Matt Goulding - great stories of traveling, eating and cooking from Piedmont to Sicily. The chapter about taking pizzaioli classes in Naples is great.

“Tasting Italy” by National Geographic & America’s Test Kitchen - Beautiful photos and really good recipes. My copy has red wine stains on some pages.

“See You in the Piazza” by Frances Mayes - she cares a little more about churches and Italian architecture than I do, but this is a terrific book for discovering the small towns in Italy, Sicily and Sardinia. The meals and recipes are worth the price!

Photo Tour/Workshops

Want to give a really special gift? One of my colleagues is offering a Photography Workshop in Italy next year. Not only will you get photography tips from world-class photographers, but you’ll eat and drink well, too.

Read about the workshop and contact Catherine Karnow here: http://catherinekarnowphotoworkshop.com/home

Photos from Italy

Only for M’tucci’s guests and for a limited time, the prints below are on sale for the holidays. They are printed on 13” x 19” Luster Paper with archival ink with an approximate 1” border. Click on the photo to see it large. Each print is signed and is $150. Please contact me, Michael Lewis: [email protected]


Buon Natale (Merry Christmas)

Christmas in Italy has many traditions, and as one could expect, many of them revolve around food. Fish is usually the main course for Christmas Eve and meat is served on Christmas Day. Midnight mass is very popular with many families, who afterwards return home for a glass of spumante or prosecco and the opening of presents from Babbo Natale (Father Christmas/Santa Claus).

The Christmas day meal will likely last for hours, starting with seafood dishes, cured meat and olives the primi might be tortellini in broth or lasagna or pasticcio (baked pasta), then roast meat or chicken. The main meal is usually followed by pandoro (a traditional Veronese yeast sweet bread) and panettone, chocolate or homemade cookies.

Babbo Natale is gaining popularity in Italy, as is gift giving during the holiday season. In that spirit, here are some gift ideas to help you have an “Italian” holiday season.

Food & Drink

M’tucci’s Provisions has created three holiday cookie boxes and two types of house-made panettone. Details and ordering information are listed just below.

Of course, who wouldn’t love getting a gift certificate from M’tucci’s?

LaMarca Prosecco is perfect for holiday cocktail parties. At the moment, I’m really enjoying a red from Southern Italy, Appassimento by Bonari and Il Bruciato, Guada al Tasso from Antinori from Tuscany. Il Bruciato is on the wine list at M’tucci’s Italian and you can find both locally in wine shops. Splurge on that special someone and buy them a bottle of Brunello di Montalcino, a Barolo, or one of the Super Tuscans, such as Sassicaia or Tignanello. The liquid gift that won’t disappear during one dinner is an Amaro. One of the best being Quintessentia Amaro Nonino. There are cheaper Amari, but this one is well worth the extra money, with the perfect balance of herbal, sweet and bitter.

Tully’s Deli on San Mateo has a very good selection of dried pasta by DeCecco, canned tomatoes, and very good extra virgin olive oils/EVOO (the best selection I have seen in ABQ).

If it’s cured meat you want, definitely go to Molinari’s website (this San Francisco institution probably makes the best commercial U.S. salami you can buy).

Eataly has a good website with a large assortment of EVOO, truffle products, and gift baskets.

After my first trip to Italy, I was hooked on cappuccino. Upon returning, I bought an entry level espresso machine, but quickly outgrew it. I upgraded to a well-known Italian brand, Gaggia, and have been using their burr grinder (necessary for great espresso) and the Gaggia Classic for many years. You won’t find them locally, but the website Whole Latte Love has everything you will need for great espresso and cappuccino at home. I regularly buy the Hermes Espresso Blend from Red Rock Roasters and occasionally splurge on one of the espresso blends from Cutbow Coffee.

Coffee Table Books

Since I used to shoot assignments for National Geographic, I’m a bit biased when it comes to recommending photo books on Italy. A few stand out:

“Rome: Eternal City: Rome in the Photographs Collection of the Royal Institute of British Architects” - published this year

“National Geographic Inside the Vatican” by James Stanfield

“One Hundred & One Beautiful Small Towns in Italy” (Rizzoli Classics)

“Italy Seen through Magnum's Lens: From Henri Cartier-Bresson to Paolo Pellegrin”

Recipes, Food & Drink

If you only had one Italian cookbook, it should be “Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking” by Marcella Hazan. As the title says, it is essential. I’m not that big of a fan of Ina, Giada or Lidia, so I don’t mention their books here:

“The Mozza Cookbook: Recipes from Los Angeles's Favorite Italian Restaurant and Pizzeria” by Nancy Silverton

“Amaro: The Spirited World of Bittersweet, Herbal Liqueurs, with Cocktails, Recipes, and Formulas”

“Red, White, and Greens: The Italian Way with Vegetables” by Faith Willinger

“Italian Wines” by Gambero Rosso - An annual guide to the best of Italy.

“Treasures of the Italian Table” by Burton Anderson - one of my favorites. Hard to find and a bit expensive, but worth every penny.

Travel & Food (some with recipes)

“Pasta, Pane, Vino: Deep Travels Through Italy’s Food Culture” by Matt Goulding - great stories of traveling, eating and cooking from Piedmont to Sicily. The chapter about taking pizzaioli classes in Naples is great.

“Tasting Italy” by National Geographic & America’s Test Kitchen - Beautiful photos and really good recipes. My copy has red wine stains on some pages.

“See You in the Piazza” by Frances Mayes - she cares a little more about churches and Italian architecture than I do, but this is a terrific book for discovering the small towns in Italy, Sicily and Sardinia. The meals and recipes are worth the price!

Photo Tour/Workshops

Want to give a really special gift? One of my colleagues is offering a Photography Workshop in Italy next year. Not only will you get photography tips from world-class photographers, but you’ll eat and drink well, too.

Read about the workshop and contact Catherine Karnow here: http://catherinekarnowphotoworkshop.com/home

Photos from Italy

Only for M’tucci’s guests and for a limited time, the prints below are on sale for the holidays. They are printed on 13” x 19” Luster Paper with archival ink with an approximate 1” border. Click on the photo to see it large. Each print is signed and is $150. Please contact me, Michael Lewis: [email protected]


Buon Natale (Merry Christmas)

Christmas in Italy has many traditions, and as one could expect, many of them revolve around food. Fish is usually the main course for Christmas Eve and meat is served on Christmas Day. Midnight mass is very popular with many families, who afterwards return home for a glass of spumante or prosecco and the opening of presents from Babbo Natale (Father Christmas/Santa Claus).

The Christmas day meal will likely last for hours, starting with seafood dishes, cured meat and olives the primi might be tortellini in broth or lasagna or pasticcio (baked pasta), then roast meat or chicken. The main meal is usually followed by pandoro (a traditional Veronese yeast sweet bread) and panettone, chocolate or homemade cookies.

Babbo Natale is gaining popularity in Italy, as is gift giving during the holiday season. In that spirit, here are some gift ideas to help you have an “Italian” holiday season.

Food & Drink

M’tucci’s Provisions has created three holiday cookie boxes and two types of house-made panettone. Details and ordering information are listed just below.

Of course, who wouldn’t love getting a gift certificate from M’tucci’s?

LaMarca Prosecco is perfect for holiday cocktail parties. At the moment, I’m really enjoying a red from Southern Italy, Appassimento by Bonari and Il Bruciato, Guada al Tasso from Antinori from Tuscany. Il Bruciato is on the wine list at M’tucci’s Italian and you can find both locally in wine shops. Splurge on that special someone and buy them a bottle of Brunello di Montalcino, a Barolo, or one of the Super Tuscans, such as Sassicaia or Tignanello. The liquid gift that won’t disappear during one dinner is an Amaro. One of the best being Quintessentia Amaro Nonino. There are cheaper Amari, but this one is well worth the extra money, with the perfect balance of herbal, sweet and bitter.

Tully’s Deli on San Mateo has a very good selection of dried pasta by DeCecco, canned tomatoes, and very good extra virgin olive oils/EVOO (the best selection I have seen in ABQ).

If it’s cured meat you want, definitely go to Molinari’s website (this San Francisco institution probably makes the best commercial U.S. salami you can buy).

Eataly has a good website with a large assortment of EVOO, truffle products, and gift baskets.

After my first trip to Italy, I was hooked on cappuccino. Upon returning, I bought an entry level espresso machine, but quickly outgrew it. I upgraded to a well-known Italian brand, Gaggia, and have been using their burr grinder (necessary for great espresso) and the Gaggia Classic for many years. You won’t find them locally, but the website Whole Latte Love has everything you will need for great espresso and cappuccino at home. I regularly buy the Hermes Espresso Blend from Red Rock Roasters and occasionally splurge on one of the espresso blends from Cutbow Coffee.

Coffee Table Books

Since I used to shoot assignments for National Geographic, I’m a bit biased when it comes to recommending photo books on Italy. A few stand out:

“Rome: Eternal City: Rome in the Photographs Collection of the Royal Institute of British Architects” - published this year

“National Geographic Inside the Vatican” by James Stanfield

“One Hundred & One Beautiful Small Towns in Italy” (Rizzoli Classics)

“Italy Seen through Magnum's Lens: From Henri Cartier-Bresson to Paolo Pellegrin”

Recipes, Food & Drink

If you only had one Italian cookbook, it should be “Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking” by Marcella Hazan. As the title says, it is essential. I’m not that big of a fan of Ina, Giada or Lidia, so I don’t mention their books here:

“The Mozza Cookbook: Recipes from Los Angeles's Favorite Italian Restaurant and Pizzeria” by Nancy Silverton

“Amaro: The Spirited World of Bittersweet, Herbal Liqueurs, with Cocktails, Recipes, and Formulas”

“Red, White, and Greens: The Italian Way with Vegetables” by Faith Willinger

“Italian Wines” by Gambero Rosso - An annual guide to the best of Italy.

“Treasures of the Italian Table” by Burton Anderson - one of my favorites. Hard to find and a bit expensive, but worth every penny.

Travel & Food (some with recipes)

“Pasta, Pane, Vino: Deep Travels Through Italy’s Food Culture” by Matt Goulding - great stories of traveling, eating and cooking from Piedmont to Sicily. The chapter about taking pizzaioli classes in Naples is great.

“Tasting Italy” by National Geographic & America’s Test Kitchen - Beautiful photos and really good recipes. My copy has red wine stains on some pages.

“See You in the Piazza” by Frances Mayes - she cares a little more about churches and Italian architecture than I do, but this is a terrific book for discovering the small towns in Italy, Sicily and Sardinia. The meals and recipes are worth the price!

Photo Tour/Workshops

Want to give a really special gift? One of my colleagues is offering a Photography Workshop in Italy next year. Not only will you get photography tips from world-class photographers, but you’ll eat and drink well, too.

Read about the workshop and contact Catherine Karnow here: http://catherinekarnowphotoworkshop.com/home

Photos from Italy

Only for M’tucci’s guests and for a limited time, the prints below are on sale for the holidays. They are printed on 13” x 19” Luster Paper with archival ink with an approximate 1” border. Click on the photo to see it large. Each print is signed and is $150. Please contact me, Michael Lewis: [email protected]


Buon Natale (Merry Christmas)

Christmas in Italy has many traditions, and as one could expect, many of them revolve around food. Fish is usually the main course for Christmas Eve and meat is served on Christmas Day. Midnight mass is very popular with many families, who afterwards return home for a glass of spumante or prosecco and the opening of presents from Babbo Natale (Father Christmas/Santa Claus).

The Christmas day meal will likely last for hours, starting with seafood dishes, cured meat and olives the primi might be tortellini in broth or lasagna or pasticcio (baked pasta), then roast meat or chicken. The main meal is usually followed by pandoro (a traditional Veronese yeast sweet bread) and panettone, chocolate or homemade cookies.

Babbo Natale is gaining popularity in Italy, as is gift giving during the holiday season. In that spirit, here are some gift ideas to help you have an “Italian” holiday season.

Food & Drink

M’tucci’s Provisions has created three holiday cookie boxes and two types of house-made panettone. Details and ordering information are listed just below.

Of course, who wouldn’t love getting a gift certificate from M’tucci’s?

LaMarca Prosecco is perfect for holiday cocktail parties. At the moment, I’m really enjoying a red from Southern Italy, Appassimento by Bonari and Il Bruciato, Guada al Tasso from Antinori from Tuscany. Il Bruciato is on the wine list at M’tucci’s Italian and you can find both locally in wine shops. Splurge on that special someone and buy them a bottle of Brunello di Montalcino, a Barolo, or one of the Super Tuscans, such as Sassicaia or Tignanello. The liquid gift that won’t disappear during one dinner is an Amaro. One of the best being Quintessentia Amaro Nonino. There are cheaper Amari, but this one is well worth the extra money, with the perfect balance of herbal, sweet and bitter.

Tully’s Deli on San Mateo has a very good selection of dried pasta by DeCecco, canned tomatoes, and very good extra virgin olive oils/EVOO (the best selection I have seen in ABQ).

If it’s cured meat you want, definitely go to Molinari’s website (this San Francisco institution probably makes the best commercial U.S. salami you can buy).

Eataly has a good website with a large assortment of EVOO, truffle products, and gift baskets.

After my first trip to Italy, I was hooked on cappuccino. Upon returning, I bought an entry level espresso machine, but quickly outgrew it. I upgraded to a well-known Italian brand, Gaggia, and have been using their burr grinder (necessary for great espresso) and the Gaggia Classic for many years. You won’t find them locally, but the website Whole Latte Love has everything you will need for great espresso and cappuccino at home. I regularly buy the Hermes Espresso Blend from Red Rock Roasters and occasionally splurge on one of the espresso blends from Cutbow Coffee.

Coffee Table Books

Since I used to shoot assignments for National Geographic, I’m a bit biased when it comes to recommending photo books on Italy. A few stand out:

“Rome: Eternal City: Rome in the Photographs Collection of the Royal Institute of British Architects” - published this year

“National Geographic Inside the Vatican” by James Stanfield

“One Hundred & One Beautiful Small Towns in Italy” (Rizzoli Classics)

“Italy Seen through Magnum's Lens: From Henri Cartier-Bresson to Paolo Pellegrin”

Recipes, Food & Drink

If you only had one Italian cookbook, it should be “Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking” by Marcella Hazan. As the title says, it is essential. I’m not that big of a fan of Ina, Giada or Lidia, so I don’t mention their books here:

“The Mozza Cookbook: Recipes from Los Angeles's Favorite Italian Restaurant and Pizzeria” by Nancy Silverton

“Amaro: The Spirited World of Bittersweet, Herbal Liqueurs, with Cocktails, Recipes, and Formulas”

“Red, White, and Greens: The Italian Way with Vegetables” by Faith Willinger

“Italian Wines” by Gambero Rosso - An annual guide to the best of Italy.

“Treasures of the Italian Table” by Burton Anderson - one of my favorites. Hard to find and a bit expensive, but worth every penny.

Travel & Food (some with recipes)

“Pasta, Pane, Vino: Deep Travels Through Italy’s Food Culture” by Matt Goulding - great stories of traveling, eating and cooking from Piedmont to Sicily. The chapter about taking pizzaioli classes in Naples is great.

“Tasting Italy” by National Geographic & America’s Test Kitchen - Beautiful photos and really good recipes. My copy has red wine stains on some pages.

“See You in the Piazza” by Frances Mayes - she cares a little more about churches and Italian architecture than I do, but this is a terrific book for discovering the small towns in Italy, Sicily and Sardinia. The meals and recipes are worth the price!

Photo Tour/Workshops

Want to give a really special gift? One of my colleagues is offering a Photography Workshop in Italy next year. Not only will you get photography tips from world-class photographers, but you’ll eat and drink well, too.

Read about the workshop and contact Catherine Karnow here: http://catherinekarnowphotoworkshop.com/home

Photos from Italy

Only for M’tucci’s guests and for a limited time, the prints below are on sale for the holidays. They are printed on 13” x 19” Luster Paper with archival ink with an approximate 1” border. Click on the photo to see it large. Each print is signed and is $150. Please contact me, Michael Lewis: [email protected]


Buon Natale (Merry Christmas)

Christmas in Italy has many traditions, and as one could expect, many of them revolve around food. Fish is usually the main course for Christmas Eve and meat is served on Christmas Day. Midnight mass is very popular with many families, who afterwards return home for a glass of spumante or prosecco and the opening of presents from Babbo Natale (Father Christmas/Santa Claus).

The Christmas day meal will likely last for hours, starting with seafood dishes, cured meat and olives the primi might be tortellini in broth or lasagna or pasticcio (baked pasta), then roast meat or chicken. The main meal is usually followed by pandoro (a traditional Veronese yeast sweet bread) and panettone, chocolate or homemade cookies.

Babbo Natale is gaining popularity in Italy, as is gift giving during the holiday season. In that spirit, here are some gift ideas to help you have an “Italian” holiday season.

Food & Drink

M’tucci’s Provisions has created three holiday cookie boxes and two types of house-made panettone. Details and ordering information are listed just below.

Of course, who wouldn’t love getting a gift certificate from M’tucci’s?

LaMarca Prosecco is perfect for holiday cocktail parties. At the moment, I’m really enjoying a red from Southern Italy, Appassimento by Bonari and Il Bruciato, Guada al Tasso from Antinori from Tuscany. Il Bruciato is on the wine list at M’tucci’s Italian and you can find both locally in wine shops. Splurge on that special someone and buy them a bottle of Brunello di Montalcino, a Barolo, or one of the Super Tuscans, such as Sassicaia or Tignanello. The liquid gift that won’t disappear during one dinner is an Amaro. One of the best being Quintessentia Amaro Nonino. There are cheaper Amari, but this one is well worth the extra money, with the perfect balance of herbal, sweet and bitter.

Tully’s Deli on San Mateo has a very good selection of dried pasta by DeCecco, canned tomatoes, and very good extra virgin olive oils/EVOO (the best selection I have seen in ABQ).

If it’s cured meat you want, definitely go to Molinari’s website (this San Francisco institution probably makes the best commercial U.S. salami you can buy).

Eataly has a good website with a large assortment of EVOO, truffle products, and gift baskets.

After my first trip to Italy, I was hooked on cappuccino. Upon returning, I bought an entry level espresso machine, but quickly outgrew it. I upgraded to a well-known Italian brand, Gaggia, and have been using their burr grinder (necessary for great espresso) and the Gaggia Classic for many years. You won’t find them locally, but the website Whole Latte Love has everything you will need for great espresso and cappuccino at home. I regularly buy the Hermes Espresso Blend from Red Rock Roasters and occasionally splurge on one of the espresso blends from Cutbow Coffee.

Coffee Table Books

Since I used to shoot assignments for National Geographic, I’m a bit biased when it comes to recommending photo books on Italy. A few stand out:

“Rome: Eternal City: Rome in the Photographs Collection of the Royal Institute of British Architects” - published this year

“National Geographic Inside the Vatican” by James Stanfield

“One Hundred & One Beautiful Small Towns in Italy” (Rizzoli Classics)

“Italy Seen through Magnum's Lens: From Henri Cartier-Bresson to Paolo Pellegrin”

Recipes, Food & Drink

If you only had one Italian cookbook, it should be “Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking” by Marcella Hazan. As the title says, it is essential. I’m not that big of a fan of Ina, Giada or Lidia, so I don’t mention their books here:

“The Mozza Cookbook: Recipes from Los Angeles's Favorite Italian Restaurant and Pizzeria” by Nancy Silverton

“Amaro: The Spirited World of Bittersweet, Herbal Liqueurs, with Cocktails, Recipes, and Formulas”

“Red, White, and Greens: The Italian Way with Vegetables” by Faith Willinger

“Italian Wines” by Gambero Rosso - An annual guide to the best of Italy.

“Treasures of the Italian Table” by Burton Anderson - one of my favorites. Hard to find and a bit expensive, but worth every penny.

Travel & Food (some with recipes)

“Pasta, Pane, Vino: Deep Travels Through Italy’s Food Culture” by Matt Goulding - great stories of traveling, eating and cooking from Piedmont to Sicily. The chapter about taking pizzaioli classes in Naples is great.

“Tasting Italy” by National Geographic & America’s Test Kitchen - Beautiful photos and really good recipes. My copy has red wine stains on some pages.

“See You in the Piazza” by Frances Mayes - she cares a little more about churches and Italian architecture than I do, but this is a terrific book for discovering the small towns in Italy, Sicily and Sardinia. The meals and recipes are worth the price!

Photo Tour/Workshops

Want to give a really special gift? One of my colleagues is offering a Photography Workshop in Italy next year. Not only will you get photography tips from world-class photographers, but you’ll eat and drink well, too.

Read about the workshop and contact Catherine Karnow here: http://catherinekarnowphotoworkshop.com/home

Photos from Italy

Only for M’tucci’s guests and for a limited time, the prints below are on sale for the holidays. They are printed on 13” x 19” Luster Paper with archival ink with an approximate 1” border. Click on the photo to see it large. Each print is signed and is $150. Please contact me, Michael Lewis: [email protected]


Buon Natale (Merry Christmas)

Christmas in Italy has many traditions, and as one could expect, many of them revolve around food. Fish is usually the main course for Christmas Eve and meat is served on Christmas Day. Midnight mass is very popular with many families, who afterwards return home for a glass of spumante or prosecco and the opening of presents from Babbo Natale (Father Christmas/Santa Claus).

The Christmas day meal will likely last for hours, starting with seafood dishes, cured meat and olives the primi might be tortellini in broth or lasagna or pasticcio (baked pasta), then roast meat or chicken. The main meal is usually followed by pandoro (a traditional Veronese yeast sweet bread) and panettone, chocolate or homemade cookies.

Babbo Natale is gaining popularity in Italy, as is gift giving during the holiday season. In that spirit, here are some gift ideas to help you have an “Italian” holiday season.

Food & Drink

M’tucci’s Provisions has created three holiday cookie boxes and two types of house-made panettone. Details and ordering information are listed just below.

Of course, who wouldn’t love getting a gift certificate from M’tucci’s?

LaMarca Prosecco is perfect for holiday cocktail parties. At the moment, I’m really enjoying a red from Southern Italy, Appassimento by Bonari and Il Bruciato, Guada al Tasso from Antinori from Tuscany. Il Bruciato is on the wine list at M’tucci’s Italian and you can find both locally in wine shops. Splurge on that special someone and buy them a bottle of Brunello di Montalcino, a Barolo, or one of the Super Tuscans, such as Sassicaia or Tignanello. The liquid gift that won’t disappear during one dinner is an Amaro. One of the best being Quintessentia Amaro Nonino. There are cheaper Amari, but this one is well worth the extra money, with the perfect balance of herbal, sweet and bitter.

Tully’s Deli on San Mateo has a very good selection of dried pasta by DeCecco, canned tomatoes, and very good extra virgin olive oils/EVOO (the best selection I have seen in ABQ).

If it’s cured meat you want, definitely go to Molinari’s website (this San Francisco institution probably makes the best commercial U.S. salami you can buy).

Eataly has a good website with a large assortment of EVOO, truffle products, and gift baskets.

After my first trip to Italy, I was hooked on cappuccino. Upon returning, I bought an entry level espresso machine, but quickly outgrew it. I upgraded to a well-known Italian brand, Gaggia, and have been using their burr grinder (necessary for great espresso) and the Gaggia Classic for many years. You won’t find them locally, but the website Whole Latte Love has everything you will need for great espresso and cappuccino at home. I regularly buy the Hermes Espresso Blend from Red Rock Roasters and occasionally splurge on one of the espresso blends from Cutbow Coffee.

Coffee Table Books

Since I used to shoot assignments for National Geographic, I’m a bit biased when it comes to recommending photo books on Italy. A few stand out:

“Rome: Eternal City: Rome in the Photographs Collection of the Royal Institute of British Architects” - published this year

“National Geographic Inside the Vatican” by James Stanfield

“One Hundred & One Beautiful Small Towns in Italy” (Rizzoli Classics)

“Italy Seen through Magnum's Lens: From Henri Cartier-Bresson to Paolo Pellegrin”

Recipes, Food & Drink

If you only had one Italian cookbook, it should be “Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking” by Marcella Hazan. As the title says, it is essential. I’m not that big of a fan of Ina, Giada or Lidia, so I don’t mention their books here:

“The Mozza Cookbook: Recipes from Los Angeles's Favorite Italian Restaurant and Pizzeria” by Nancy Silverton

“Amaro: The Spirited World of Bittersweet, Herbal Liqueurs, with Cocktails, Recipes, and Formulas”

“Red, White, and Greens: The Italian Way with Vegetables” by Faith Willinger

“Italian Wines” by Gambero Rosso - An annual guide to the best of Italy.

“Treasures of the Italian Table” by Burton Anderson - one of my favorites. Hard to find and a bit expensive, but worth every penny.

Travel & Food (some with recipes)

“Pasta, Pane, Vino: Deep Travels Through Italy’s Food Culture” by Matt Goulding - great stories of traveling, eating and cooking from Piedmont to Sicily. The chapter about taking pizzaioli classes in Naples is great.

“Tasting Italy” by National Geographic & America’s Test Kitchen - Beautiful photos and really good recipes. My copy has red wine stains on some pages.

“See You in the Piazza” by Frances Mayes - she cares a little more about churches and Italian architecture than I do, but this is a terrific book for discovering the small towns in Italy, Sicily and Sardinia. The meals and recipes are worth the price!

Photo Tour/Workshops

Want to give a really special gift? One of my colleagues is offering a Photography Workshop in Italy next year. Not only will you get photography tips from world-class photographers, but you’ll eat and drink well, too.

Read about the workshop and contact Catherine Karnow here: http://catherinekarnowphotoworkshop.com/home

Photos from Italy

Only for M’tucci’s guests and for a limited time, the prints below are on sale for the holidays. They are printed on 13” x 19” Luster Paper with archival ink with an approximate 1” border. Click on the photo to see it large. Each print is signed and is $150. Please contact me, Michael Lewis: michael[email protected]


Buon Natale (Merry Christmas)

Christmas in Italy has many traditions, and as one could expect, many of them revolve around food. Fish is usually the main course for Christmas Eve and meat is served on Christmas Day. Midnight mass is very popular with many families, who afterwards return home for a glass of spumante or prosecco and the opening of presents from Babbo Natale (Father Christmas/Santa Claus).

The Christmas day meal will likely last for hours, starting with seafood dishes, cured meat and olives the primi might be tortellini in broth or lasagna or pasticcio (baked pasta), then roast meat or chicken. The main meal is usually followed by pandoro (a traditional Veronese yeast sweet bread) and panettone, chocolate or homemade cookies.

Babbo Natale is gaining popularity in Italy, as is gift giving during the holiday season. In that spirit, here are some gift ideas to help you have an “Italian” holiday season.

Food & Drink

M’tucci’s Provisions has created three holiday cookie boxes and two types of house-made panettone. Details and ordering information are listed just below.

Of course, who wouldn’t love getting a gift certificate from M’tucci’s?

LaMarca Prosecco is perfect for holiday cocktail parties. At the moment, I’m really enjoying a red from Southern Italy, Appassimento by Bonari and Il Bruciato, Guada al Tasso from Antinori from Tuscany. Il Bruciato is on the wine list at M’tucci’s Italian and you can find both locally in wine shops. Splurge on that special someone and buy them a bottle of Brunello di Montalcino, a Barolo, or one of the Super Tuscans, such as Sassicaia or Tignanello. The liquid gift that won’t disappear during one dinner is an Amaro. One of the best being Quintessentia Amaro Nonino. There are cheaper Amari, but this one is well worth the extra money, with the perfect balance of herbal, sweet and bitter.

Tully’s Deli on San Mateo has a very good selection of dried pasta by DeCecco, canned tomatoes, and very good extra virgin olive oils/EVOO (the best selection I have seen in ABQ).

If it’s cured meat you want, definitely go to Molinari’s website (this San Francisco institution probably makes the best commercial U.S. salami you can buy).

Eataly has a good website with a large assortment of EVOO, truffle products, and gift baskets.

After my first trip to Italy, I was hooked on cappuccino. Upon returning, I bought an entry level espresso machine, but quickly outgrew it. I upgraded to a well-known Italian brand, Gaggia, and have been using their burr grinder (necessary for great espresso) and the Gaggia Classic for many years. You won’t find them locally, but the website Whole Latte Love has everything you will need for great espresso and cappuccino at home. I regularly buy the Hermes Espresso Blend from Red Rock Roasters and occasionally splurge on one of the espresso blends from Cutbow Coffee.

Coffee Table Books

Since I used to shoot assignments for National Geographic, I’m a bit biased when it comes to recommending photo books on Italy. A few stand out:

“Rome: Eternal City: Rome in the Photographs Collection of the Royal Institute of British Architects” - published this year

“National Geographic Inside the Vatican” by James Stanfield

“One Hundred & One Beautiful Small Towns in Italy” (Rizzoli Classics)

“Italy Seen through Magnum's Lens: From Henri Cartier-Bresson to Paolo Pellegrin”

Recipes, Food & Drink

If you only had one Italian cookbook, it should be “Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking” by Marcella Hazan. As the title says, it is essential. I’m not that big of a fan of Ina, Giada or Lidia, so I don’t mention their books here:

“The Mozza Cookbook: Recipes from Los Angeles's Favorite Italian Restaurant and Pizzeria” by Nancy Silverton

“Amaro: The Spirited World of Bittersweet, Herbal Liqueurs, with Cocktails, Recipes, and Formulas”

“Red, White, and Greens: The Italian Way with Vegetables” by Faith Willinger

“Italian Wines” by Gambero Rosso - An annual guide to the best of Italy.

“Treasures of the Italian Table” by Burton Anderson - one of my favorites. Hard to find and a bit expensive, but worth every penny.

Travel & Food (some with recipes)

“Pasta, Pane, Vino: Deep Travels Through Italy’s Food Culture” by Matt Goulding - great stories of traveling, eating and cooking from Piedmont to Sicily. The chapter about taking pizzaioli classes in Naples is great.

“Tasting Italy” by National Geographic & America’s Test Kitchen - Beautiful photos and really good recipes. My copy has red wine stains on some pages.

“See You in the Piazza” by Frances Mayes - she cares a little more about churches and Italian architecture than I do, but this is a terrific book for discovering the small towns in Italy, Sicily and Sardinia. The meals and recipes are worth the price!

Photo Tour/Workshops

Want to give a really special gift? One of my colleagues is offering a Photography Workshop in Italy next year. Not only will you get photography tips from world-class photographers, but you’ll eat and drink well, too.

Read about the workshop and contact Catherine Karnow here: http://catherinekarnowphotoworkshop.com/home

Photos from Italy

Only for M’tucci’s guests and for a limited time, the prints below are on sale for the holidays. They are printed on 13” x 19” Luster Paper with archival ink with an approximate 1” border. Click on the photo to see it large. Each print is signed and is $150. Please contact me, Michael Lewis: [email protected]


Buon Natale (Merry Christmas)

Christmas in Italy has many traditions, and as one could expect, many of them revolve around food. Fish is usually the main course for Christmas Eve and meat is served on Christmas Day. Midnight mass is very popular with many families, who afterwards return home for a glass of spumante or prosecco and the opening of presents from Babbo Natale (Father Christmas/Santa Claus).

The Christmas day meal will likely last for hours, starting with seafood dishes, cured meat and olives the primi might be tortellini in broth or lasagna or pasticcio (baked pasta), then roast meat or chicken. The main meal is usually followed by pandoro (a traditional Veronese yeast sweet bread) and panettone, chocolate or homemade cookies.

Babbo Natale is gaining popularity in Italy, as is gift giving during the holiday season. In that spirit, here are some gift ideas to help you have an “Italian” holiday season.

Food & Drink

M’tucci’s Provisions has created three holiday cookie boxes and two types of house-made panettone. Details and ordering information are listed just below.

Of course, who wouldn’t love getting a gift certificate from M’tucci’s?

LaMarca Prosecco is perfect for holiday cocktail parties. At the moment, I’m really enjoying a red from Southern Italy, Appassimento by Bonari and Il Bruciato, Guada al Tasso from Antinori from Tuscany. Il Bruciato is on the wine list at M’tucci’s Italian and you can find both locally in wine shops. Splurge on that special someone and buy them a bottle of Brunello di Montalcino, a Barolo, or one of the Super Tuscans, such as Sassicaia or Tignanello. The liquid gift that won’t disappear during one dinner is an Amaro. One of the best being Quintessentia Amaro Nonino. There are cheaper Amari, but this one is well worth the extra money, with the perfect balance of herbal, sweet and bitter.

Tully’s Deli on San Mateo has a very good selection of dried pasta by DeCecco, canned tomatoes, and very good extra virgin olive oils/EVOO (the best selection I have seen in ABQ).

If it’s cured meat you want, definitely go to Molinari’s website (this San Francisco institution probably makes the best commercial U.S. salami you can buy).

Eataly has a good website with a large assortment of EVOO, truffle products, and gift baskets.

After my first trip to Italy, I was hooked on cappuccino. Upon returning, I bought an entry level espresso machine, but quickly outgrew it. I upgraded to a well-known Italian brand, Gaggia, and have been using their burr grinder (necessary for great espresso) and the Gaggia Classic for many years. You won’t find them locally, but the website Whole Latte Love has everything you will need for great espresso and cappuccino at home. I regularly buy the Hermes Espresso Blend from Red Rock Roasters and occasionally splurge on one of the espresso blends from Cutbow Coffee.

Coffee Table Books

Since I used to shoot assignments for National Geographic, I’m a bit biased when it comes to recommending photo books on Italy. A few stand out:

“Rome: Eternal City: Rome in the Photographs Collection of the Royal Institute of British Architects” - published this year

“National Geographic Inside the Vatican” by James Stanfield

“One Hundred & One Beautiful Small Towns in Italy” (Rizzoli Classics)

“Italy Seen through Magnum's Lens: From Henri Cartier-Bresson to Paolo Pellegrin”

Recipes, Food & Drink

If you only had one Italian cookbook, it should be “Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking” by Marcella Hazan. As the title says, it is essential. I’m not that big of a fan of Ina, Giada or Lidia, so I don’t mention their books here:

“The Mozza Cookbook: Recipes from Los Angeles's Favorite Italian Restaurant and Pizzeria” by Nancy Silverton

“Amaro: The Spirited World of Bittersweet, Herbal Liqueurs, with Cocktails, Recipes, and Formulas”

“Red, White, and Greens: The Italian Way with Vegetables” by Faith Willinger

“Italian Wines” by Gambero Rosso - An annual guide to the best of Italy.

“Treasures of the Italian Table” by Burton Anderson - one of my favorites. Hard to find and a bit expensive, but worth every penny.

Travel & Food (some with recipes)

“Pasta, Pane, Vino: Deep Travels Through Italy’s Food Culture” by Matt Goulding - great stories of traveling, eating and cooking from Piedmont to Sicily. The chapter about taking pizzaioli classes in Naples is great.

“Tasting Italy” by National Geographic & America’s Test Kitchen - Beautiful photos and really good recipes. My copy has red wine stains on some pages.

“See You in the Piazza” by Frances Mayes - she cares a little more about churches and Italian architecture than I do, but this is a terrific book for discovering the small towns in Italy, Sicily and Sardinia. The meals and recipes are worth the price!

Photo Tour/Workshops

Want to give a really special gift? One of my colleagues is offering a Photography Workshop in Italy next year. Not only will you get photography tips from world-class photographers, but you’ll eat and drink well, too.

Read about the workshop and contact Catherine Karnow here: http://catherinekarnowphotoworkshop.com/home

Photos from Italy

Only for M’tucci’s guests and for a limited time, the prints below are on sale for the holidays. They are printed on 13” x 19” Luster Paper with archival ink with an approximate 1” border. Click on the photo to see it large. Each print is signed and is $150. Please contact me, Michael Lewis: [email protected]


Watch the video: EASY NEW YEARS EVE PARTY DIYS (January 2022).