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How to Throw an Earth-Friendly Wedding Slideshow

How to Throw an Earth-Friendly Wedding Slideshow


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You don’t have to destroy the earth to have your dream day

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There are plenty of ways to show off both your new love and your love of the environment without breaking the bank. From holding your wedding ceremony and reception in the same venue to planning everything online to buying previously used décor and clothing, you can have a beautiful day while still showing respect for nature.

How to Throw an Earth-Friendly Wedding

iStock

There are plenty of ways to show off both your new love and your love of the environment without breaking the bank. From holding your wedding ceremony and reception in the same venue to planning everything online to buying previously used décor and clothing, you can have a beautiful day while still showing respect for nature.

Get Married Outdoors in the Summer

Summer weddings are not only a delight in their own right, thanks to warm, inviting weather, but they can also cut down on the ecological impact of your big day. Embrace summer and host your ceremony and reception outside. Not only will you get to embrace the natural beauty of your surroundings (be they a botanical garden, beach, or backyard), but the sunlight will provide all of your lighting. If you worry about temperature, provide fans, plenty of water, and cooling stations for your guests.

Pick a Shared Ceremony and Reception Space

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When in the initial stages of planning your wedding, find a venue that can pull double duty. Choosing a space that will host your wedding ceremony and reception will cut down on carbon emissions as your guests drive from one place to another. Bonus: Having one space for everything is also a great convenience for your attendees, since they won’t have to worry about travel.

Send Out Invitations Online

Finding eco-friendly wedding invitations made from recycled paper or other materials such as cotton is very possible, but it can be prohibitively expensive. Instead, create a fabulous and glamorous wedding website and encourage all of your guests to go there for hotel information, RSVPs, and your registry.

Register for Eco-Friendly Items and Charities

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Speaking of wedding registries, pay close attention to what you scan when you sign up for yours. Find home décor, rags, bedding, and kitchen items that are made locally and from organic, sustainable materials. If you’re looking to minimize the stuff in your life, consider doing a charitable registry and asking your guests to donate to the Wildlife Conservation Network, the Sierra Club, the Nature Conservancy, or your favorite green charity.

Rent or Buy Previously Used Wedding Clothing

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Picking out your dream wedding dress is a highlight of wedding planning, but that one garment has a huge ecological impact. From the silk used to the shipping and production costs (most dresses are custom-made overseas), there’s a lot that goes into an extravagant piece of clothing. Consider re-wearing your mother’s wedding gown or shopping secondhand. As for the wedding party, encourage them to wear something they already have (in the same color, of course) or renting something from Rent the Runway.

Find a Farm-to-Table Caterer

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When planning your wedding menu, an organic farm-to-table caterer is a must. Using locally-sourced produce and meats for your meal will cut down massively on travel costs and fuel emissions. And as an additional bonus, using a farm-to-table caterer ensures that your food will be as fresh, tender, and delicious as possible.

Shop at Flea Markets and Secondhand Stores for Décor

Having an eclectic, vintage-inspired wedding is still a popular trend throughout the United States, so don’t be afraid to go a little shabby-chic with your décor. Instead of buying new items, shop at thrift stores and flea markets for various wedding details, such as centerpieces, picture frames, and vases. You never know what you may find! Decorating your wedding reception this way will ensure that each table is unique and your day is truly one-of-a-kind.

Get Local, Organic Flowers (or No Flowers at All)

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Using a local florist ensures that you’re getting fresh, regional, and in-season blooms that will last longer and have a lesser ecological impact. Buying out-of-season or out-of-region flowers means tons of energy wasted on gas, refrigeration costs, and botanical upkeep, so that’s definitely something to avoid. If you really want to make your wedding as green as possible, consider alternative bouquets such as ones made of recycled paper, brooches, or succulents that can be used over and over again.

Toss Seed Bombs or Compostable Items

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Having guests shower the bride and groom with confetti, bubbles, or rice is a true wedding tradition, but leaving soap or trash on the ground is less than earth-friendly. Luckily, there are plenty of alternatives. Have your guests toss seed bombs, so wildflowers will sprout. You can also make confetti from unconventional items, such as flower petals or leaves.

Emphasize Recycling and Composting

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Coordinate with your wedding venue so that in addition to trash cans, there will be bins for recycling and composting. We all know why recycling is good, but composting food scraps and decomposable paper goods helps to enrich the soil with much-needed nutrients.

Light the Room with Candles

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Totally pass on electricity on your big day by lighting your reception area with candles. Not only will this give your day an extra dose of romance, but keeping the lights off will conserve electricity. Just be careful not to burn the whole place down!

Have Green Wedding Favors

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Wedding favors frequently get tossed in the trash or buried in guests’ closets, so make yours something that will benefit the environment instead. Whether you give out succulents, seed packets, or small tree sprouts, encouraging your wedding guests to plant something is an easy way to help the environment.


Look Who's Coming to Celebrate: How to Be a Great Wedding Guest

Love is in the air&mdashalong with the aroma of fresh flowers&mdashprepping us for this year's whirlwind wedding season. Of all the events on the spring social menu, weddings should be the best of all because they celebrate love, hope and new beginnings. Which, last time I checked, are all things we like. So why is it many of us dread the arrival of that oversize invitation in the mail? Is it the extensive checklist of intrusions and annoyances that go with the party? Forget them&mdashhere is my advice on how to have a fabulous time while being a great wedding guest!

Remember to consult the wedding party (instead of pestering the harried bride) to find out where the couple is registered and send the gift to the couple's house (instead of bringing it to the wedding).

Do not think of the gift tradition as a quid pro quo transaction, a hunk of silver or a heavy kitchen appliance traded for multiple trips to the buffet, several glasses of champagne and dancing until your feet hurt. If budget is bugging you and you're considering skipping the event to avoid skimping, rethink your intentions and offer your expertise in lieu of a traditional gift. Tech-savvy? Offer to keep the couple's wedding website updated with information, photos and videos. Extraordinary kitchen skills? Make their favorite childhood treats to serve at their shower or engagement party.

Also, giving something from the registry may sound impersonal, but at least you know it's stuff they actually want. Put your personal stamp on it with simple tweaks, like a panini grill given with your favorite gourmet grilled cheese recipe. Or wine glasses given with a bottle of wine from the year you met. Or, go in with a group to by a big-ticket item and fill a mini paper photo album with snaps of each of the participants as the card.

Photo: Thinkstock/David De Lossy

Don't even think of missing out on the celebration. Sure, you can think of a million excuses not to go&mdashOutfit: Feels like cling-wrap! Gift: Credit card maxed! Babysitter: Unavailable! When you get the invite, RSVP ASAP. Go to the event even if you are invited without a guest, dress happy, enjoy the cocktails. just not too much!

There's a secret to being a great guest, and it's simple: Always bring your best self to the party. In other words, take this opportunity to check your troubles at the door. Work, relationships, financial troubles&mdashtoss 'em out the window for a few hours. Make it your mission to get the party rolling. Burst into the room with a twinkle in your eye and ignite the fun fuse.

Married? Consider the wedding a date for romance and be especially affectionate with your honey. On the way to the ceremony, program the car with your personal greatest hits album to get psyched up (for me, it's Gavin Rossdale's "Love Remains the Same"). Once you arrive, break the ice for the other guests with public displays of affection.

If you're flying solo, remember that even if you arrive alone, you need not remain alone. This is an opportunity, a potentially life-changing-for-the-better opportunity&mdashseize it! Steal a flower from a centerpiece and wear it in your hair (or your lapel), or present it with great pomp to someone who looks fun. Hit the singles' table with a bucket of optimism. Be open to the possibility of surprise in the form of an interesting stranger or even an old friend. Okay, you might not meet The One (cue the trumpets), but you never know until you do, and that's certainly worth rolling the dice.

Hiding in the last row because you think you're not photogenic? Be part of the history of the event! Angela Janklow, the former managing director of Dolce&Gabbana, gave me the best advice on this one (she should know, she once had to pose for Vanity Fair mag with Brooke Shields). Her cheat sheet for surviving that photo session, and each one since, reproduced for your reading pleasure, is as follows:

  • No one takes great photos straight on. Figure out which is your best side.
  • Turn 3/4 to the camera with your best side facing the camera.
  • Slightly lower your chin and raise your eyes.
  • Avoid multiple cameras taking the same shot (they all won't catch your best side).

Now you all you have to do is make sure the happy couple have the greatest night of their lives!


Look Who's Coming to Celebrate: How to Be a Great Wedding Guest

Love is in the air&mdashalong with the aroma of fresh flowers&mdashprepping us for this year's whirlwind wedding season. Of all the events on the spring social menu, weddings should be the best of all because they celebrate love, hope and new beginnings. Which, last time I checked, are all things we like. So why is it many of us dread the arrival of that oversize invitation in the mail? Is it the extensive checklist of intrusions and annoyances that go with the party? Forget them&mdashhere is my advice on how to have a fabulous time while being a great wedding guest!

Remember to consult the wedding party (instead of pestering the harried bride) to find out where the couple is registered and send the gift to the couple's house (instead of bringing it to the wedding).

Do not think of the gift tradition as a quid pro quo transaction, a hunk of silver or a heavy kitchen appliance traded for multiple trips to the buffet, several glasses of champagne and dancing until your feet hurt. If budget is bugging you and you're considering skipping the event to avoid skimping, rethink your intentions and offer your expertise in lieu of a traditional gift. Tech-savvy? Offer to keep the couple's wedding website updated with information, photos and videos. Extraordinary kitchen skills? Make their favorite childhood treats to serve at their shower or engagement party.

Also, giving something from the registry may sound impersonal, but at least you know it's stuff they actually want. Put your personal stamp on it with simple tweaks, like a panini grill given with your favorite gourmet grilled cheese recipe. Or wine glasses given with a bottle of wine from the year you met. Or, go in with a group to by a big-ticket item and fill a mini paper photo album with snaps of each of the participants as the card.

Photo: Thinkstock/David De Lossy

Don't even think of missing out on the celebration. Sure, you can think of a million excuses not to go&mdashOutfit: Feels like cling-wrap! Gift: Credit card maxed! Babysitter: Unavailable! When you get the invite, RSVP ASAP. Go to the event even if you are invited without a guest, dress happy, enjoy the cocktails. just not too much!

There's a secret to being a great guest, and it's simple: Always bring your best self to the party. In other words, take this opportunity to check your troubles at the door. Work, relationships, financial troubles&mdashtoss 'em out the window for a few hours. Make it your mission to get the party rolling. Burst into the room with a twinkle in your eye and ignite the fun fuse.

Married? Consider the wedding a date for romance and be especially affectionate with your honey. On the way to the ceremony, program the car with your personal greatest hits album to get psyched up (for me, it's Gavin Rossdale's "Love Remains the Same"). Once you arrive, break the ice for the other guests with public displays of affection.

If you're flying solo, remember that even if you arrive alone, you need not remain alone. This is an opportunity, a potentially life-changing-for-the-better opportunity&mdashseize it! Steal a flower from a centerpiece and wear it in your hair (or your lapel), or present it with great pomp to someone who looks fun. Hit the singles' table with a bucket of optimism. Be open to the possibility of surprise in the form of an interesting stranger or even an old friend. Okay, you might not meet The One (cue the trumpets), but you never know until you do, and that's certainly worth rolling the dice.

Hiding in the last row because you think you're not photogenic? Be part of the history of the event! Angela Janklow, the former managing director of Dolce&Gabbana, gave me the best advice on this one (she should know, she once had to pose for Vanity Fair mag with Brooke Shields). Her cheat sheet for surviving that photo session, and each one since, reproduced for your reading pleasure, is as follows:

  • No one takes great photos straight on. Figure out which is your best side.
  • Turn 3/4 to the camera with your best side facing the camera.
  • Slightly lower your chin and raise your eyes.
  • Avoid multiple cameras taking the same shot (they all won't catch your best side).

Now you all you have to do is make sure the happy couple have the greatest night of their lives!


Look Who's Coming to Celebrate: How to Be a Great Wedding Guest

Love is in the air&mdashalong with the aroma of fresh flowers&mdashprepping us for this year's whirlwind wedding season. Of all the events on the spring social menu, weddings should be the best of all because they celebrate love, hope and new beginnings. Which, last time I checked, are all things we like. So why is it many of us dread the arrival of that oversize invitation in the mail? Is it the extensive checklist of intrusions and annoyances that go with the party? Forget them&mdashhere is my advice on how to have a fabulous time while being a great wedding guest!

Remember to consult the wedding party (instead of pestering the harried bride) to find out where the couple is registered and send the gift to the couple's house (instead of bringing it to the wedding).

Do not think of the gift tradition as a quid pro quo transaction, a hunk of silver or a heavy kitchen appliance traded for multiple trips to the buffet, several glasses of champagne and dancing until your feet hurt. If budget is bugging you and you're considering skipping the event to avoid skimping, rethink your intentions and offer your expertise in lieu of a traditional gift. Tech-savvy? Offer to keep the couple's wedding website updated with information, photos and videos. Extraordinary kitchen skills? Make their favorite childhood treats to serve at their shower or engagement party.

Also, giving something from the registry may sound impersonal, but at least you know it's stuff they actually want. Put your personal stamp on it with simple tweaks, like a panini grill given with your favorite gourmet grilled cheese recipe. Or wine glasses given with a bottle of wine from the year you met. Or, go in with a group to by a big-ticket item and fill a mini paper photo album with snaps of each of the participants as the card.

Photo: Thinkstock/David De Lossy

Don't even think of missing out on the celebration. Sure, you can think of a million excuses not to go&mdashOutfit: Feels like cling-wrap! Gift: Credit card maxed! Babysitter: Unavailable! When you get the invite, RSVP ASAP. Go to the event even if you are invited without a guest, dress happy, enjoy the cocktails. just not too much!

There's a secret to being a great guest, and it's simple: Always bring your best self to the party. In other words, take this opportunity to check your troubles at the door. Work, relationships, financial troubles&mdashtoss 'em out the window for a few hours. Make it your mission to get the party rolling. Burst into the room with a twinkle in your eye and ignite the fun fuse.

Married? Consider the wedding a date for romance and be especially affectionate with your honey. On the way to the ceremony, program the car with your personal greatest hits album to get psyched up (for me, it's Gavin Rossdale's "Love Remains the Same"). Once you arrive, break the ice for the other guests with public displays of affection.

If you're flying solo, remember that even if you arrive alone, you need not remain alone. This is an opportunity, a potentially life-changing-for-the-better opportunity&mdashseize it! Steal a flower from a centerpiece and wear it in your hair (or your lapel), or present it with great pomp to someone who looks fun. Hit the singles' table with a bucket of optimism. Be open to the possibility of surprise in the form of an interesting stranger or even an old friend. Okay, you might not meet The One (cue the trumpets), but you never know until you do, and that's certainly worth rolling the dice.

Hiding in the last row because you think you're not photogenic? Be part of the history of the event! Angela Janklow, the former managing director of Dolce&Gabbana, gave me the best advice on this one (she should know, she once had to pose for Vanity Fair mag with Brooke Shields). Her cheat sheet for surviving that photo session, and each one since, reproduced for your reading pleasure, is as follows:

  • No one takes great photos straight on. Figure out which is your best side.
  • Turn 3/4 to the camera with your best side facing the camera.
  • Slightly lower your chin and raise your eyes.
  • Avoid multiple cameras taking the same shot (they all won't catch your best side).

Now you all you have to do is make sure the happy couple have the greatest night of their lives!


Look Who's Coming to Celebrate: How to Be a Great Wedding Guest

Love is in the air&mdashalong with the aroma of fresh flowers&mdashprepping us for this year's whirlwind wedding season. Of all the events on the spring social menu, weddings should be the best of all because they celebrate love, hope and new beginnings. Which, last time I checked, are all things we like. So why is it many of us dread the arrival of that oversize invitation in the mail? Is it the extensive checklist of intrusions and annoyances that go with the party? Forget them&mdashhere is my advice on how to have a fabulous time while being a great wedding guest!

Remember to consult the wedding party (instead of pestering the harried bride) to find out where the couple is registered and send the gift to the couple's house (instead of bringing it to the wedding).

Do not think of the gift tradition as a quid pro quo transaction, a hunk of silver or a heavy kitchen appliance traded for multiple trips to the buffet, several glasses of champagne and dancing until your feet hurt. If budget is bugging you and you're considering skipping the event to avoid skimping, rethink your intentions and offer your expertise in lieu of a traditional gift. Tech-savvy? Offer to keep the couple's wedding website updated with information, photos and videos. Extraordinary kitchen skills? Make their favorite childhood treats to serve at their shower or engagement party.

Also, giving something from the registry may sound impersonal, but at least you know it's stuff they actually want. Put your personal stamp on it with simple tweaks, like a panini grill given with your favorite gourmet grilled cheese recipe. Or wine glasses given with a bottle of wine from the year you met. Or, go in with a group to by a big-ticket item and fill a mini paper photo album with snaps of each of the participants as the card.

Photo: Thinkstock/David De Lossy

Don't even think of missing out on the celebration. Sure, you can think of a million excuses not to go&mdashOutfit: Feels like cling-wrap! Gift: Credit card maxed! Babysitter: Unavailable! When you get the invite, RSVP ASAP. Go to the event even if you are invited without a guest, dress happy, enjoy the cocktails. just not too much!

There's a secret to being a great guest, and it's simple: Always bring your best self to the party. In other words, take this opportunity to check your troubles at the door. Work, relationships, financial troubles&mdashtoss 'em out the window for a few hours. Make it your mission to get the party rolling. Burst into the room with a twinkle in your eye and ignite the fun fuse.

Married? Consider the wedding a date for romance and be especially affectionate with your honey. On the way to the ceremony, program the car with your personal greatest hits album to get psyched up (for me, it's Gavin Rossdale's "Love Remains the Same"). Once you arrive, break the ice for the other guests with public displays of affection.

If you're flying solo, remember that even if you arrive alone, you need not remain alone. This is an opportunity, a potentially life-changing-for-the-better opportunity&mdashseize it! Steal a flower from a centerpiece and wear it in your hair (or your lapel), or present it with great pomp to someone who looks fun. Hit the singles' table with a bucket of optimism. Be open to the possibility of surprise in the form of an interesting stranger or even an old friend. Okay, you might not meet The One (cue the trumpets), but you never know until you do, and that's certainly worth rolling the dice.

Hiding in the last row because you think you're not photogenic? Be part of the history of the event! Angela Janklow, the former managing director of Dolce&Gabbana, gave me the best advice on this one (she should know, she once had to pose for Vanity Fair mag with Brooke Shields). Her cheat sheet for surviving that photo session, and each one since, reproduced for your reading pleasure, is as follows:

  • No one takes great photos straight on. Figure out which is your best side.
  • Turn 3/4 to the camera with your best side facing the camera.
  • Slightly lower your chin and raise your eyes.
  • Avoid multiple cameras taking the same shot (they all won't catch your best side).

Now you all you have to do is make sure the happy couple have the greatest night of their lives!


Look Who's Coming to Celebrate: How to Be a Great Wedding Guest

Love is in the air&mdashalong with the aroma of fresh flowers&mdashprepping us for this year's whirlwind wedding season. Of all the events on the spring social menu, weddings should be the best of all because they celebrate love, hope and new beginnings. Which, last time I checked, are all things we like. So why is it many of us dread the arrival of that oversize invitation in the mail? Is it the extensive checklist of intrusions and annoyances that go with the party? Forget them&mdashhere is my advice on how to have a fabulous time while being a great wedding guest!

Remember to consult the wedding party (instead of pestering the harried bride) to find out where the couple is registered and send the gift to the couple's house (instead of bringing it to the wedding).

Do not think of the gift tradition as a quid pro quo transaction, a hunk of silver or a heavy kitchen appliance traded for multiple trips to the buffet, several glasses of champagne and dancing until your feet hurt. If budget is bugging you and you're considering skipping the event to avoid skimping, rethink your intentions and offer your expertise in lieu of a traditional gift. Tech-savvy? Offer to keep the couple's wedding website updated with information, photos and videos. Extraordinary kitchen skills? Make their favorite childhood treats to serve at their shower or engagement party.

Also, giving something from the registry may sound impersonal, but at least you know it's stuff they actually want. Put your personal stamp on it with simple tweaks, like a panini grill given with your favorite gourmet grilled cheese recipe. Or wine glasses given with a bottle of wine from the year you met. Or, go in with a group to by a big-ticket item and fill a mini paper photo album with snaps of each of the participants as the card.

Photo: Thinkstock/David De Lossy

Don't even think of missing out on the celebration. Sure, you can think of a million excuses not to go&mdashOutfit: Feels like cling-wrap! Gift: Credit card maxed! Babysitter: Unavailable! When you get the invite, RSVP ASAP. Go to the event even if you are invited without a guest, dress happy, enjoy the cocktails. just not too much!

There's a secret to being a great guest, and it's simple: Always bring your best self to the party. In other words, take this opportunity to check your troubles at the door. Work, relationships, financial troubles&mdashtoss 'em out the window for a few hours. Make it your mission to get the party rolling. Burst into the room with a twinkle in your eye and ignite the fun fuse.

Married? Consider the wedding a date for romance and be especially affectionate with your honey. On the way to the ceremony, program the car with your personal greatest hits album to get psyched up (for me, it's Gavin Rossdale's "Love Remains the Same"). Once you arrive, break the ice for the other guests with public displays of affection.

If you're flying solo, remember that even if you arrive alone, you need not remain alone. This is an opportunity, a potentially life-changing-for-the-better opportunity&mdashseize it! Steal a flower from a centerpiece and wear it in your hair (or your lapel), or present it with great pomp to someone who looks fun. Hit the singles' table with a bucket of optimism. Be open to the possibility of surprise in the form of an interesting stranger or even an old friend. Okay, you might not meet The One (cue the trumpets), but you never know until you do, and that's certainly worth rolling the dice.

Hiding in the last row because you think you're not photogenic? Be part of the history of the event! Angela Janklow, the former managing director of Dolce&Gabbana, gave me the best advice on this one (she should know, she once had to pose for Vanity Fair mag with Brooke Shields). Her cheat sheet for surviving that photo session, and each one since, reproduced for your reading pleasure, is as follows:

  • No one takes great photos straight on. Figure out which is your best side.
  • Turn 3/4 to the camera with your best side facing the camera.
  • Slightly lower your chin and raise your eyes.
  • Avoid multiple cameras taking the same shot (they all won't catch your best side).

Now you all you have to do is make sure the happy couple have the greatest night of their lives!


Look Who's Coming to Celebrate: How to Be a Great Wedding Guest

Love is in the air&mdashalong with the aroma of fresh flowers&mdashprepping us for this year's whirlwind wedding season. Of all the events on the spring social menu, weddings should be the best of all because they celebrate love, hope and new beginnings. Which, last time I checked, are all things we like. So why is it many of us dread the arrival of that oversize invitation in the mail? Is it the extensive checklist of intrusions and annoyances that go with the party? Forget them&mdashhere is my advice on how to have a fabulous time while being a great wedding guest!

Remember to consult the wedding party (instead of pestering the harried bride) to find out where the couple is registered and send the gift to the couple's house (instead of bringing it to the wedding).

Do not think of the gift tradition as a quid pro quo transaction, a hunk of silver or a heavy kitchen appliance traded for multiple trips to the buffet, several glasses of champagne and dancing until your feet hurt. If budget is bugging you and you're considering skipping the event to avoid skimping, rethink your intentions and offer your expertise in lieu of a traditional gift. Tech-savvy? Offer to keep the couple's wedding website updated with information, photos and videos. Extraordinary kitchen skills? Make their favorite childhood treats to serve at their shower or engagement party.

Also, giving something from the registry may sound impersonal, but at least you know it's stuff they actually want. Put your personal stamp on it with simple tweaks, like a panini grill given with your favorite gourmet grilled cheese recipe. Or wine glasses given with a bottle of wine from the year you met. Or, go in with a group to by a big-ticket item and fill a mini paper photo album with snaps of each of the participants as the card.

Photo: Thinkstock/David De Lossy

Don't even think of missing out on the celebration. Sure, you can think of a million excuses not to go&mdashOutfit: Feels like cling-wrap! Gift: Credit card maxed! Babysitter: Unavailable! When you get the invite, RSVP ASAP. Go to the event even if you are invited without a guest, dress happy, enjoy the cocktails. just not too much!

There's a secret to being a great guest, and it's simple: Always bring your best self to the party. In other words, take this opportunity to check your troubles at the door. Work, relationships, financial troubles&mdashtoss 'em out the window for a few hours. Make it your mission to get the party rolling. Burst into the room with a twinkle in your eye and ignite the fun fuse.

Married? Consider the wedding a date for romance and be especially affectionate with your honey. On the way to the ceremony, program the car with your personal greatest hits album to get psyched up (for me, it's Gavin Rossdale's "Love Remains the Same"). Once you arrive, break the ice for the other guests with public displays of affection.

If you're flying solo, remember that even if you arrive alone, you need not remain alone. This is an opportunity, a potentially life-changing-for-the-better opportunity&mdashseize it! Steal a flower from a centerpiece and wear it in your hair (or your lapel), or present it with great pomp to someone who looks fun. Hit the singles' table with a bucket of optimism. Be open to the possibility of surprise in the form of an interesting stranger or even an old friend. Okay, you might not meet The One (cue the trumpets), but you never know until you do, and that's certainly worth rolling the dice.

Hiding in the last row because you think you're not photogenic? Be part of the history of the event! Angela Janklow, the former managing director of Dolce&Gabbana, gave me the best advice on this one (she should know, she once had to pose for Vanity Fair mag with Brooke Shields). Her cheat sheet for surviving that photo session, and each one since, reproduced for your reading pleasure, is as follows:

  • No one takes great photos straight on. Figure out which is your best side.
  • Turn 3/4 to the camera with your best side facing the camera.
  • Slightly lower your chin and raise your eyes.
  • Avoid multiple cameras taking the same shot (they all won't catch your best side).

Now you all you have to do is make sure the happy couple have the greatest night of their lives!


Look Who's Coming to Celebrate: How to Be a Great Wedding Guest

Love is in the air&mdashalong with the aroma of fresh flowers&mdashprepping us for this year's whirlwind wedding season. Of all the events on the spring social menu, weddings should be the best of all because they celebrate love, hope and new beginnings. Which, last time I checked, are all things we like. So why is it many of us dread the arrival of that oversize invitation in the mail? Is it the extensive checklist of intrusions and annoyances that go with the party? Forget them&mdashhere is my advice on how to have a fabulous time while being a great wedding guest!

Remember to consult the wedding party (instead of pestering the harried bride) to find out where the couple is registered and send the gift to the couple's house (instead of bringing it to the wedding).

Do not think of the gift tradition as a quid pro quo transaction, a hunk of silver or a heavy kitchen appliance traded for multiple trips to the buffet, several glasses of champagne and dancing until your feet hurt. If budget is bugging you and you're considering skipping the event to avoid skimping, rethink your intentions and offer your expertise in lieu of a traditional gift. Tech-savvy? Offer to keep the couple's wedding website updated with information, photos and videos. Extraordinary kitchen skills? Make their favorite childhood treats to serve at their shower or engagement party.

Also, giving something from the registry may sound impersonal, but at least you know it's stuff they actually want. Put your personal stamp on it with simple tweaks, like a panini grill given with your favorite gourmet grilled cheese recipe. Or wine glasses given with a bottle of wine from the year you met. Or, go in with a group to by a big-ticket item and fill a mini paper photo album with snaps of each of the participants as the card.

Photo: Thinkstock/David De Lossy

Don't even think of missing out on the celebration. Sure, you can think of a million excuses not to go&mdashOutfit: Feels like cling-wrap! Gift: Credit card maxed! Babysitter: Unavailable! When you get the invite, RSVP ASAP. Go to the event even if you are invited without a guest, dress happy, enjoy the cocktails. just not too much!

There's a secret to being a great guest, and it's simple: Always bring your best self to the party. In other words, take this opportunity to check your troubles at the door. Work, relationships, financial troubles&mdashtoss 'em out the window for a few hours. Make it your mission to get the party rolling. Burst into the room with a twinkle in your eye and ignite the fun fuse.

Married? Consider the wedding a date for romance and be especially affectionate with your honey. On the way to the ceremony, program the car with your personal greatest hits album to get psyched up (for me, it's Gavin Rossdale's "Love Remains the Same"). Once you arrive, break the ice for the other guests with public displays of affection.

If you're flying solo, remember that even if you arrive alone, you need not remain alone. This is an opportunity, a potentially life-changing-for-the-better opportunity&mdashseize it! Steal a flower from a centerpiece and wear it in your hair (or your lapel), or present it with great pomp to someone who looks fun. Hit the singles' table with a bucket of optimism. Be open to the possibility of surprise in the form of an interesting stranger or even an old friend. Okay, you might not meet The One (cue the trumpets), but you never know until you do, and that's certainly worth rolling the dice.

Hiding in the last row because you think you're not photogenic? Be part of the history of the event! Angela Janklow, the former managing director of Dolce&Gabbana, gave me the best advice on this one (she should know, she once had to pose for Vanity Fair mag with Brooke Shields). Her cheat sheet for surviving that photo session, and each one since, reproduced for your reading pleasure, is as follows:

  • No one takes great photos straight on. Figure out which is your best side.
  • Turn 3/4 to the camera with your best side facing the camera.
  • Slightly lower your chin and raise your eyes.
  • Avoid multiple cameras taking the same shot (they all won't catch your best side).

Now you all you have to do is make sure the happy couple have the greatest night of their lives!


Look Who's Coming to Celebrate: How to Be a Great Wedding Guest

Love is in the air&mdashalong with the aroma of fresh flowers&mdashprepping us for this year's whirlwind wedding season. Of all the events on the spring social menu, weddings should be the best of all because they celebrate love, hope and new beginnings. Which, last time I checked, are all things we like. So why is it many of us dread the arrival of that oversize invitation in the mail? Is it the extensive checklist of intrusions and annoyances that go with the party? Forget them&mdashhere is my advice on how to have a fabulous time while being a great wedding guest!

Remember to consult the wedding party (instead of pestering the harried bride) to find out where the couple is registered and send the gift to the couple's house (instead of bringing it to the wedding).

Do not think of the gift tradition as a quid pro quo transaction, a hunk of silver or a heavy kitchen appliance traded for multiple trips to the buffet, several glasses of champagne and dancing until your feet hurt. If budget is bugging you and you're considering skipping the event to avoid skimping, rethink your intentions and offer your expertise in lieu of a traditional gift. Tech-savvy? Offer to keep the couple's wedding website updated with information, photos and videos. Extraordinary kitchen skills? Make their favorite childhood treats to serve at their shower or engagement party.

Also, giving something from the registry may sound impersonal, but at least you know it's stuff they actually want. Put your personal stamp on it with simple tweaks, like a panini grill given with your favorite gourmet grilled cheese recipe. Or wine glasses given with a bottle of wine from the year you met. Or, go in with a group to by a big-ticket item and fill a mini paper photo album with snaps of each of the participants as the card.

Photo: Thinkstock/David De Lossy

Don't even think of missing out on the celebration. Sure, you can think of a million excuses not to go&mdashOutfit: Feels like cling-wrap! Gift: Credit card maxed! Babysitter: Unavailable! When you get the invite, RSVP ASAP. Go to the event even if you are invited without a guest, dress happy, enjoy the cocktails. just not too much!

There's a secret to being a great guest, and it's simple: Always bring your best self to the party. In other words, take this opportunity to check your troubles at the door. Work, relationships, financial troubles&mdashtoss 'em out the window for a few hours. Make it your mission to get the party rolling. Burst into the room with a twinkle in your eye and ignite the fun fuse.

Married? Consider the wedding a date for romance and be especially affectionate with your honey. On the way to the ceremony, program the car with your personal greatest hits album to get psyched up (for me, it's Gavin Rossdale's "Love Remains the Same"). Once you arrive, break the ice for the other guests with public displays of affection.

If you're flying solo, remember that even if you arrive alone, you need not remain alone. This is an opportunity, a potentially life-changing-for-the-better opportunity&mdashseize it! Steal a flower from a centerpiece and wear it in your hair (or your lapel), or present it with great pomp to someone who looks fun. Hit the singles' table with a bucket of optimism. Be open to the possibility of surprise in the form of an interesting stranger or even an old friend. Okay, you might not meet The One (cue the trumpets), but you never know until you do, and that's certainly worth rolling the dice.

Hiding in the last row because you think you're not photogenic? Be part of the history of the event! Angela Janklow, the former managing director of Dolce&Gabbana, gave me the best advice on this one (she should know, she once had to pose for Vanity Fair mag with Brooke Shields). Her cheat sheet for surviving that photo session, and each one since, reproduced for your reading pleasure, is as follows:

  • No one takes great photos straight on. Figure out which is your best side.
  • Turn 3/4 to the camera with your best side facing the camera.
  • Slightly lower your chin and raise your eyes.
  • Avoid multiple cameras taking the same shot (they all won't catch your best side).

Now you all you have to do is make sure the happy couple have the greatest night of their lives!


Look Who's Coming to Celebrate: How to Be a Great Wedding Guest

Love is in the air&mdashalong with the aroma of fresh flowers&mdashprepping us for this year's whirlwind wedding season. Of all the events on the spring social menu, weddings should be the best of all because they celebrate love, hope and new beginnings. Which, last time I checked, are all things we like. So why is it many of us dread the arrival of that oversize invitation in the mail? Is it the extensive checklist of intrusions and annoyances that go with the party? Forget them&mdashhere is my advice on how to have a fabulous time while being a great wedding guest!

Remember to consult the wedding party (instead of pestering the harried bride) to find out where the couple is registered and send the gift to the couple's house (instead of bringing it to the wedding).

Do not think of the gift tradition as a quid pro quo transaction, a hunk of silver or a heavy kitchen appliance traded for multiple trips to the buffet, several glasses of champagne and dancing until your feet hurt. If budget is bugging you and you're considering skipping the event to avoid skimping, rethink your intentions and offer your expertise in lieu of a traditional gift. Tech-savvy? Offer to keep the couple's wedding website updated with information, photos and videos. Extraordinary kitchen skills? Make their favorite childhood treats to serve at their shower or engagement party.

Also, giving something from the registry may sound impersonal, but at least you know it's stuff they actually want. Put your personal stamp on it with simple tweaks, like a panini grill given with your favorite gourmet grilled cheese recipe. Or wine glasses given with a bottle of wine from the year you met. Or, go in with a group to by a big-ticket item and fill a mini paper photo album with snaps of each of the participants as the card.

Photo: Thinkstock/David De Lossy

Don't even think of missing out on the celebration. Sure, you can think of a million excuses not to go&mdashOutfit: Feels like cling-wrap! Gift: Credit card maxed! Babysitter: Unavailable! When you get the invite, RSVP ASAP. Go to the event even if you are invited without a guest, dress happy, enjoy the cocktails. just not too much!

There's a secret to being a great guest, and it's simple: Always bring your best self to the party. In other words, take this opportunity to check your troubles at the door. Work, relationships, financial troubles&mdashtoss 'em out the window for a few hours. Make it your mission to get the party rolling. Burst into the room with a twinkle in your eye and ignite the fun fuse.

Married? Consider the wedding a date for romance and be especially affectionate with your honey. On the way to the ceremony, program the car with your personal greatest hits album to get psyched up (for me, it's Gavin Rossdale's "Love Remains the Same"). Once you arrive, break the ice for the other guests with public displays of affection.

If you're flying solo, remember that even if you arrive alone, you need not remain alone. This is an opportunity, a potentially life-changing-for-the-better opportunity&mdashseize it! Steal a flower from a centerpiece and wear it in your hair (or your lapel), or present it with great pomp to someone who looks fun. Hit the singles' table with a bucket of optimism. Be open to the possibility of surprise in the form of an interesting stranger or even an old friend. Okay, you might not meet The One (cue the trumpets), but you never know until you do, and that's certainly worth rolling the dice.

Hiding in the last row because you think you're not photogenic? Be part of the history of the event! Angela Janklow, the former managing director of Dolce&Gabbana, gave me the best advice on this one (she should know, she once had to pose for Vanity Fair mag with Brooke Shields). Her cheat sheet for surviving that photo session, and each one since, reproduced for your reading pleasure, is as follows:

  • No one takes great photos straight on. Figure out which is your best side.
  • Turn 3/4 to the camera with your best side facing the camera.
  • Slightly lower your chin and raise your eyes.
  • Avoid multiple cameras taking the same shot (they all won't catch your best side).

Now you all you have to do is make sure the happy couple have the greatest night of their lives!


Look Who's Coming to Celebrate: How to Be a Great Wedding Guest

Love is in the air&mdashalong with the aroma of fresh flowers&mdashprepping us for this year's whirlwind wedding season. Of all the events on the spring social menu, weddings should be the best of all because they celebrate love, hope and new beginnings. Which, last time I checked, are all things we like. So why is it many of us dread the arrival of that oversize invitation in the mail? Is it the extensive checklist of intrusions and annoyances that go with the party? Forget them&mdashhere is my advice on how to have a fabulous time while being a great wedding guest!

Remember to consult the wedding party (instead of pestering the harried bride) to find out where the couple is registered and send the gift to the couple's house (instead of bringing it to the wedding).

Do not think of the gift tradition as a quid pro quo transaction, a hunk of silver or a heavy kitchen appliance traded for multiple trips to the buffet, several glasses of champagne and dancing until your feet hurt. If budget is bugging you and you're considering skipping the event to avoid skimping, rethink your intentions and offer your expertise in lieu of a traditional gift. Tech-savvy? Offer to keep the couple's wedding website updated with information, photos and videos. Extraordinary kitchen skills? Make their favorite childhood treats to serve at their shower or engagement party.

Also, giving something from the registry may sound impersonal, but at least you know it's stuff they actually want. Put your personal stamp on it with simple tweaks, like a panini grill given with your favorite gourmet grilled cheese recipe. Or wine glasses given with a bottle of wine from the year you met. Or, go in with a group to by a big-ticket item and fill a mini paper photo album with snaps of each of the participants as the card.

Photo: Thinkstock/David De Lossy

Don't even think of missing out on the celebration. Sure, you can think of a million excuses not to go&mdashOutfit: Feels like cling-wrap! Gift: Credit card maxed! Babysitter: Unavailable! When you get the invite, RSVP ASAP. Go to the event even if you are invited without a guest, dress happy, enjoy the cocktails. just not too much!

There's a secret to being a great guest, and it's simple: Always bring your best self to the party. In other words, take this opportunity to check your troubles at the door. Work, relationships, financial troubles&mdashtoss 'em out the window for a few hours. Make it your mission to get the party rolling. Burst into the room with a twinkle in your eye and ignite the fun fuse.

Married? Consider the wedding a date for romance and be especially affectionate with your honey. On the way to the ceremony, program the car with your personal greatest hits album to get psyched up (for me, it's Gavin Rossdale's "Love Remains the Same"). Once you arrive, break the ice for the other guests with public displays of affection.

If you're flying solo, remember that even if you arrive alone, you need not remain alone. This is an opportunity, a potentially life-changing-for-the-better opportunity&mdashseize it! Steal a flower from a centerpiece and wear it in your hair (or your lapel), or present it with great pomp to someone who looks fun. Hit the singles' table with a bucket of optimism. Be open to the possibility of surprise in the form of an interesting stranger or even an old friend. Okay, you might not meet The One (cue the trumpets), but you never know until you do, and that's certainly worth rolling the dice.

Hiding in the last row because you think you're not photogenic? Be part of the history of the event! Angela Janklow, the former managing director of Dolce&Gabbana, gave me the best advice on this one (she should know, she once had to pose for Vanity Fair mag with Brooke Shields). Her cheat sheet for surviving that photo session, and each one since, reproduced for your reading pleasure, is as follows:

  • No one takes great photos straight on. Figure out which is your best side.
  • Turn 3/4 to the camera with your best side facing the camera.
  • Slightly lower your chin and raise your eyes.
  • Avoid multiple cameras taking the same shot (they all won't catch your best side).

Now you all you have to do is make sure the happy couple have the greatest night of their lives!


Watch the video: Ο πλουσιότερος άνθρωπος που πάτησε ποτέ το πόδι του στη Γη (May 2022).