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Homemade saffron pasta recipe

Homemade saffron pasta recipe


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  • Recipes
  • Ingredients
  • Pasta
  • Homemade pasta

Fragrant and colourful fresh egg pasta infused with saffron. Roll out in thin sheets with or without a pasta machine, then bake directly in a lasagne with bolognese or bechamel sauce; or make tagliatelle and serve with your favourite sauce.


Washington, United States

5 people made this

IngredientsMakes: 450 g fresh pasta (tagliatelle for 4-5, lasagne for 6-8)

  • 1 pinch saffron threads
  • 2 tablespoons hot water
  • 300g '00' or plain flour, plus extra for dusting
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 pinch salt

MethodPrep:20min ›Extra time:30min › Ready in:50min

  1. Soak the saffron threads in the water for 30 minutes.
  2. Place the flour on a marble or wooden work surface. Make a well in the centre and crack in the eggs. Add the salt and the saffron with its water.
  3. With a fork, gently beat the eggs and incorporate the saffron and surrounding flour. Gradually, the flour and the eggs will mix, creating a runny batter.
  4. With a scraper, take the remaining flour and bring towards the centre, incorporating it into the batter-like mixture. The scraper will prevent your hands from getting sticky and will help the dough become homogeneous. If the dough is too stiff, add water, 1 tablespoon at a time as needed.
  5. When the mixture forms a ball, start kneading with your hands. Flatten the ball, stretch and fold from the top towards the centre; turn 45 degrees and repeat.
  6. Knead for about 10 minutes until you get a smooth and soft dough.
  7. Shape into a ball, place in a bowl and cover with cling film. Chill in the fridge for 30 minutes to 1 hour.
  8. Roll out the dough with pasta machine or with a rolling pin.
  9. If using a rolling pin...

  10. Divide the dough into 3 equal portions. Take the first one, flatten a bit and roll with the pin 5 to 6 times. Turn the dough 45 degrees and roll again, 5 to 6 times. Keep rolling and turning in the same way, till the dough reaches a consistent thickness.
  11. To make lasagne: roll out the dough to a 1mm thickness and with a pastry cutter or a knife cut out rectangular sheets according to the shape and size of your baking dish. Transfer to a floured cloth and air dry for about 30 minutes. If thin enough, you won't need to blanch before baking.
  12. To make tagliatelle: roll out the dough a bit thicker, about 2mm. Flour the dough generously, then roll in a loose cylinder. Slice the cylinder into 7mm portions. Once cut, quickly unroll the strips and transfer on a floured tablecloth. Toss generously in flour, so they do not get sticky. Air dry 30 minutes before cooking for 3 to 5 minutes in plenty of salted, boiling water, or until al dente.
  13. If using a pasta machine...

  14. Divide the dough into 3 equal portions. Flatten the first piece and pass through the thickest setting of the pasta machine. Dust with more flour, fold in half like a book and repeat 3 to 4 times - always flouring, folding and passing through the thickest setting - until the dough is smooth in texture, even in size and no longer sticky.
  15. Move the pasta machine to a middle setting and pass each sheet through once. Move to the next to the last setting and pass through once.
  16. For lasagne: cut the long strip in half. Pass the first half through the very last and thinnest setting. You'll obtain a very long and thin sheet. Place on a floured cloth. Repeat with the remaining dough to obtain 6 long sheets.
  17. Cut out the sheets to fit your baking dish. Air dry for 30 minutes, then assemble and bake. You don't need to blanch before filling.
  18. For tagliatelle: Keep the dough a bit thicker, passing only through the next to the last setting and skipping the thinnest setting. Cut each sheet in half.
  19. Add the attachment to the pasta machine and pass the strip through the tagliatelle attachment. With one hand roll the machine handle and with the other collect the pasta. (You can use other attachments, such as tagliolini or pappardelle, to get different shapes.)
  20. Gently place on a floured tablecloth, tossing with some more flour. Air dry for 30 minutes before cooking in plenty of salted, boiling water for 3 to 5 minutes, or until al dente.

Make ahead

Air dry the pasta overnight, dusting with more flour if still wet. Once completely dry it will become stiff. Store in a paper bag and use within a couple of days.

Saffron

You can use saffron threads as stated, or saffron powder. Italian saffron powder comes in small sachets, weighing 0.125g. Use one sachet in this recipe in place of the threads, if desired.

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Homemade saffron pasta dough

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Yellow Tomato & Saffron Pasta

We’re giving the sauce for this pasta a few sophisticated twists: a pinch of saffron for complex flavor and specialty yellow tomatoes for gorgeous sunny color. Bursts of flavor from briny capers and hot red pepper flakes add even more Italian-style flare to the dish.

Please note nutritional information, including ingredients and allergens, may differ from above based on your location. Location-specific nutritional information is available for viewing upon subscribing, or by logging in if you are already a subscriber.

Title

Fill a medium pot with salted water cover and heat to boiling on high. Wash and dry the peppers cut off and discard the stems, then remove the cores. Halve the peppers lengthwise thinly slice crosswise. Peel and roughly chop 2 cloves of garlic. Roughly chop the capers. Place the tomatoes in a bowl gently break apart with your hands.

Add the pasta to the pot of boiling water. Cook, stirring occasionally, 8 to 10 minutes, or until al dente (still slightly firm to the bite). Drain thoroughly.

While the pasta cooks, in a medium pan (nonstick, if you have one), heat a drizzle of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the chopped garlic season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, 30 seconds to 1 minute, or until slightly softened. Add the sliced peppers, chopped capers, and as much of the red pepper flakes as you&rsquod like, depending on how spicy you&rsquod like the dish to be season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, 2 to 3 minutes, or until softened. Add the tomatoes (carefully, as the liquid may splatter) and saffron. Season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring frequently, 2 to 3 minutes, or until the liquid is slightly thickened. Turn off the heat.

Add the cooked pasta and butter to the pan of sauce. Cook on medium-high, stirring constantly, 1 to 2 minutes, or until the butter is melted and the pasta is thoroughly coated. Turn off the heat. Taste, then season with salt and pepper if desired. Serve the finished pasta garnished with the cheese. Enjoy!

Tips from Home Chefs

About Blue Apron

Blue Apron delivers original, step-by-step recipes and fresh ingredients to customers nationwide. Our menus change every week, so with each delivery you learn to cook inventive new dishes with seasonal ingredients. By letting us source these hard-to-find ingredients for you, you'll get food that is fresher and cheaper than you can get at your local supermarket, and there's no waste because we only send you what you need for each recipe.

We named our company &ldquoBlue Apron&rdquo because chefs around the world wear blue aprons when they're learning to cook, and it has become a symbol of lifelong learning in cooking. We believe you're never done learning in the kitchen, so we design our menus to ensure you're always learning new cooking techniques, trying new cuisines, and using unique ingredients.

Blue Apron is a weekly subscription service with no commitment - you can skip a week or cancel at any time with a week's notice. We can't wait to cook with you!

Fill a medium pot with salted water cover and heat to boiling on high. Wash and dry the peppers cut off and discard the stems, then remove the cores. Halve the peppers lengthwise thinly slice crosswise. Peel and roughly chop 2 cloves of garlic. Roughly chop the capers. Place the tomatoes in a bowl gently break apart with your hands.

Add the pasta to the pot of boiling water. Cook, stirring occasionally, 8 to 10 minutes, or until al dente (still slightly firm to the bite). Drain thoroughly.

While the pasta cooks, in a medium pan (nonstick, if you have one), heat a drizzle of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the chopped garlic season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, 30 seconds to 1 minute, or until slightly softened. Add the sliced peppers, chopped capers, and as much of the red pepper flakes as you&rsquod like, depending on how spicy you&rsquod like the dish to be season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, 2 to 3 minutes, or until softened. Add the tomatoes (carefully, as the liquid may splatter) and saffron. Season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring frequently, 2 to 3 minutes, or until the liquid is slightly thickened. Turn off the heat.

Add the cooked pasta and butter to the pan of sauce. Cook on medium-high, stirring constantly, 1 to 2 minutes, or until the butter is melted and the pasta is thoroughly coated. Turn off the heat. Taste, then season with salt and pepper if desired. Serve the finished pasta garnished with the cheese. Enjoy!


Basic Fresh Pasta Dough

  • Yield 4 to 6 servings for cut pasta, 6 to 8 servings for stuffed pasta
  • Time About 45 minutes, plus 30 minutes resting time

Karsten Moran for The New York Times

Fresh pasta isn't something to master in one go. It takes time and practice, but it yields dividends. This particular recipe is vastly versatile. It can be made into whole grain pasta, by swapping in 1 cup sifted whole wheat, spelt or farro flour in place of 1 cup all-purpose or 00 flour. Add more egg yolks or water as needed and rest the dough for 1 hour. Or try a green pasta, as in this ravioli verdi: Steam or sauté 6 ounces baby spinach (about 6 cups) until just wilted. Spread it out on a parchment-lined baking sheet, and, when cool, squeeze water out thoroughly, a handful at a time, then chop roughly. Purée with 2 eggs and 1 egg yolk, then use this mixture in place of eggs in the recipe. Or, for something a little different, make an herbed pasta, like this pappardelle, by stirring in 1/2 cup finely chopped parsley, chives, chervil, tarragon, or basil in any combination to the eggs before adding to the flour in the main recipe.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups 00 or all-purpose flour
  • 2 large eggs
  • 3 egg yolks, plus more as needed
  • Semolina flour, for dusting

Preparation

  1. Mound the flour in the center of a large, wide mixing bowl. Dig a well in the center of the mound and add eggs and yolks. Using a fork, beat together the eggs and begin to incorporate the flour, starting with the inner rim of the well. The dough will start to come together in a shaggy mass when about half of the flour is incorporated.
  2. Use your fingers to continue to mix the dough. Press any loose bits of flour into the mass of dough. If needed, add another egg yolk or a tablespoon of water to absorb all of the flour. Once the dough comes together into a cohesive mass, remove it from the bowl.
  3. Transfer to a lightly floured surface and knead by hand for 4 to 5 more minutes until the dough is smooth, elastic and uniform in color. Wrap the dough in plastic and set aside for at least 30 minutes (and up to 4 hours) at room temperature.
  4. Line three baking sheets with parchment paper and lightly dust with semolina flour. Set aside.
  5. Cut off a quarter of the dough. Rewrap rest, and set aside. Use the heel of your hand to flatten the dough into an oval approximately the same width as your pasta machine, about six inches. Set the rollers to their widest setting and pass the dough through.
  6. Lay the dough out onto a lightly floured cutting board or countertop and neatly press together into halves, so it’s again about the same width of the pasta machine. Feed the pasta through again at the widest setting. Think of these first rollings as an extended kneading. Continue to fold the dough in thirds and roll it until it is smooth, silky and even-textured. Do your best to make the sheet the full width of the machine.
  7. Once the dough is silky and smooth, you can begin to roll it out more thinly. Roll it once through each of the next two or three settings, adding flour as needed, until the dough is about 1/4-inch thick.
  8. Once the pasta is about 1/4-inch thick, begin rolling it twice through each setting. As you roll, lightly sprinkle all-purpose or 00 flour on both sides of the pasta to prevent it from sticking to itself.
  9. Roll out pasta until you can just see the outline of your hand when you hold it under a sheet, about 1/16-inch thick for noodles, or 1/32-inch thick for a filled pasta. (On most machines, you won’t make it to the thinnest setting.)
  10. Cut pasta into sheets, about 12 to 14 inches long. Dust the sheets lightly with semolina flour and stack on one of the prepared baking sheets and cover with a clean, lightly dampened kitchen towel. Repeat with remaining dough.

Saffron & Tomato Bucatini Pasta

This sophisticated pasta dish celebrates the bright flavors of summer with a robust sauce of charm tomatoes and sautéed summer squash (you may receive green zucchini, grey zucchini, or yellow squash). Garlic and red pepper flakes liven up the sauce, while a pinch of saffron adds a complex aromatic finish. (Seasoning your tomatoes during prep helps draw out their fresh flavor, which makes for quick and easy cooking!)

Please note nutritional information, including ingredients and allergens, may differ from above based on your location. Location-specific nutritional information is available for viewing upon subscribing, or by logging in if you are already a subscriber.

Title

Heat a large pot of salted water to boiling on high. Wash and dry the fresh produce. Quarter the squash lengthwise cut crosswise into ½-inch-thick pieces. Peel and roughly chop the garlic. Halve the tomatoes and place in a bowl season with salt and pepper.

Add the pasta to the pot of boiling water. Cook 8 to 10 minutes, or until just shy of al dente (still slightly firm to the bite). Turn off the heat. Reserving 1 cup of the pasta cooking water, drain thoroughly and return to the pot.

While the pasta cooks, in a medium pan (nonstick, if you have one), heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the squash. Cook, without stirring, 2 to 3 minutes, or until lightly browned. Season with salt and pepper.

To the pan, add the garlic and as much of the red pepper flakes as you’d like, depending on how spicy you’d like the dish to be season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring constantly, 30 seconds to 1 minute, or until fragrant. Add the tomato paste season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring constantly, 30 seconds to 1 minute, or until dark red and fragrant. Add the seasoned tomatoes and cook, stirring frequently, 1 to 2 minutes, or until slightly softened and heated through. Turn off the heat.

Pick the basil leaves off the stems discard the stems. To the pot of cooked pasta, add the cooked squash and aromatics, saffron, butter, and half the reserved pasta cooking water. Cook on medium-high, stirring vigorously, 2 to 3 minutes, or until thoroughly coated. (If the sauce seems dry, gradually add the remaining pasta cooking water to achieve your desired consistency.) Turn off the heat stir in half the basil (tearing the leaves just before adding). Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Divide the finished pasta between 2 dishes. Garnish with the cheese and remaining basil (tearing the leaves just before adding). Enjoy!

Tips from Home Chefs

About Blue Apron

Blue Apron delivers original, step-by-step recipes and fresh ingredients to customers nationwide. Our menus change every week, so with each delivery you learn to cook inventive new dishes with seasonal ingredients. By letting us source these hard-to-find ingredients for you, you'll get food that is fresher and cheaper than you can get at your local supermarket, and there's no waste because we only send you what you need for each recipe.

We named our company &ldquoBlue Apron&rdquo because chefs around the world wear blue aprons when they're learning to cook, and it has become a symbol of lifelong learning in cooking. We believe you're never done learning in the kitchen, so we design our menus to ensure you're always learning new cooking techniques, trying new cuisines, and using unique ingredients.

Blue Apron is a weekly subscription service with no commitment - you can skip a week or cancel at any time with a week's notice. We can't wait to cook with you!

Heat a large pot of salted water to boiling on high. Wash and dry the fresh produce. Quarter the squash lengthwise cut crosswise into ½-inch-thick pieces. Peel and roughly chop the garlic. Halve the tomatoes and place in a bowl season with salt and pepper.

Add the pasta to the pot of boiling water. Cook 8 to 10 minutes, or until just shy of al dente (still slightly firm to the bite). Turn off the heat. Reserving 1 cup of the pasta cooking water, drain thoroughly and return to the pot.

While the pasta cooks, in a medium pan (nonstick, if you have one), heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the squash. Cook, without stirring, 2 to 3 minutes, or until lightly browned. Season with salt and pepper.

To the pan, add the garlic and as much of the red pepper flakes as you’d like, depending on how spicy you’d like the dish to be season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring constantly, 30 seconds to 1 minute, or until fragrant. Add the tomato paste season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring constantly, 30 seconds to 1 minute, or until dark red and fragrant. Add the seasoned tomatoes and cook, stirring frequently, 1 to 2 minutes, or until slightly softened and heated through. Turn off the heat.

Pick the basil leaves off the stems discard the stems. To the pot of cooked pasta, add the cooked squash and aromatics, saffron, butter, and half the reserved pasta cooking water. Cook on medium-high, stirring vigorously, 2 to 3 minutes, or until thoroughly coated. (If the sauce seems dry, gradually add the remaining pasta cooking water to achieve your desired consistency.) Turn off the heat stir in half the basil (tearing the leaves just before adding). Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Divide the finished pasta between 2 dishes. Garnish with the cheese and remaining basil (tearing the leaves just before adding). Enjoy!


Recipe Summary

On a clean work surface, using your hands, mix together the flours. Form the mixture into a mound and create a well in the center. Crack the eggs into the well. Using a fork, gently begin to beat the eggs, mixing in a tiny bit of flour with each stroke. (Protect the well by using your non-beating hand to build up the flour around the edge as you beat.) As the dough begins to thicken and most of the flour has been added, start to stir the dough. When the dough can no longer be stirred, use your hand to mix in the remaining flour, kneading until firm and elastic. Cover with a clean towel let rest 20 minutes.

On a lightly floured surface, roll dough into an 18-inch circle about 1/16-inch thick. (Be patient. This will take some time and muscle!). Be sure to roll from the center out. The dough is thin enough when you lift it and you can start to see your hands underneath. Lightly flour the surface of the dough. Starting from the side closest to you, loosely roll into a spiral. Cut into strips 1/4- to 1/2-inch wide. Unroll strips to separate. Sprinkle lightly with flour. Let stand 1 hour.

Cook in a large pot of boiling, salted water 2 to 3 minutes or until tender drain well. Serve with desired sauce.

Add these flavor additions along to the well with the eggs. If too wet, mixture may need a bit more all-purpose flour. Herb: 2 Tbsp. chopped fresh herbs such as parsley, basil rosemary, sage, oregano, or thyme.

Beet: 1 small roasted beet, pureed until smooth (about 3 tablespoons)


Homemade Pasta Dough

Ingredients US Metric

  • 1 1/2 cups plus 1 tablespoon Italian “00” flour* (or half Italian “00” flour and half Farina di Semola)
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • Pinch sea salt

Directions

Sift the flour onto a clean work surface and use your fist to make a well in the center.

Break the eggs into the well. Add the oil and a pinch of salt to the well. If you’re coloring your homemade pasta dough, you’ll want to add the ingredient now. (See How To Color Homemade Pasta Dough below.)

Gradually mix the egg mixture into the flour using the fingers of one hand, bringing the ingredients together into a firm dough. If the dough feels too dry, simply add a little water, a few drops at a time, up to a couple tablespoons if the dough feels too wet, add a little more flour. Don’t worry, you’ll soon grow accustomed to how the dough should feel after you’ve made it a few times.) Note that you don’t want to add too much flour or your pasta will be tough and taste floury.

Knead the pasta dough until it’s smooth, 2 to 5 minutes. Lightly massage it with a touch of olive oil, tuck the dough in a resealable plastic bag, and let it rest at room temperature for at least 30 minutes. The pasta will be much more elastic after resting than it was before.

[Editor’s Note: You could opt to roll the pasta dough by hand using a long wooden rolling pin, although a pasta machine makes for far less work.] Feed the pasta dough through a pasta machine set on the widest setting. As the sheet of pasta dough comes out of the machine, fold it into thirds and then feed it through the rollers again, still on the widest setting. Pass the pasta through this same setting a total of 4 or 5 times. This takes the place of kneading the pasta dough and ensures the resulting pasta is silky smooth.

Pass the sheet of pasta dough through the machine again, repeatedly, gradually reducing the settings, one pass at a time, until the pasta achieves the desired thickness. Your sheet of pasta dough will become quite long—if you have trouble keeping the dough from folding onto itself or if you are making ravioli, cut the sheet of dough in half and feed each half through separately. Generally the second-from-last setting is best for tagliatelle and the last setting is best for ravioli and any other shapes that are to be filled.

After the sheet of pasta dough has reached the requisite thickness, hang it over a broom handle or the back of a chair to dry a little—this will make cutting it easier in humid weather, as it will not be so sticky. Or, if you’re in a hurry, you can dust the pasta with a little flour and place it on clean kitchen towels and let it rest for just a short spell.

Shape the pasta by hand (see instructions below) or pass the pasta through the chosen cutters (tagliolini, tagliatelle, etc.) and then drape the cut pasta over the broom handle or chair back again to dry just a little, until ready to cook. (Alternatively, you can toss the cut pasta again lightly in flour—preferably semolina flour—and lay it out in loose bundles on a tray lined with a clean kitchen towel.) Use the pasta as soon as possible before it sticks together or place it in a resealable plastic bag and stash it in the freezer.

Tagliatelle On a lightly floured surface, roll or fold one side of the sheet of dough loosely towards the center of the sheet, then repeat with the other side so that they almost meet in the middle. Gently fold one side on top of the other, but do not press down on the fold. Cut the dough into thin slices with a sharp knife, slicing through the folded dough quickly and deftly in a single motion. (It takes very little practice to get the hang of this.) Immediately unravel the slices to reveal the pasta ribbons. (You can do this by inserting the dull side of a large knife into each slice and gently shaking it loose. If you wait, they will stick together. Trust us.) Hang the pasta to dry a little before cooking or dust it well with semolina flour and arrange in loose nests on a tray lined with a clean kitchen towel.

Pappardelle On a lightly floured surface, cut the dough into wide ribbons using a fluted pastry cutter. Hang the pasta to dry a little before cooking.

Tortellini On a lightly floured surface, stamp out rounds of pasta using a round cookie cutter. Pipe or spoon your favorite filling into the middle of each round. Brush the edges with beaten egg and carefully fold the round into a crescent shape, pressing the dough around the filling to push out any trapped air. Using your fingertips, bend the 2 corners of the crescent around to meet one another in the center and press well to seal. Repeat with the remaining dough. Let dry on a floured kitchen towel for about 30 minutes before cooking.

Ravioli If your pasta dough is still in a single sheet, cut it into 2 equal portions. Cover one portion of the dough with a clean kitchen towel or plastic wrap while you work with the rest of the dough. Spoon small mounds (about 1 teaspoon) of filling on the dough in even rows, spacing them at 1 1/2-inch intervals. Using a pastry brush, lightly coat the dough between the mounds with beaten egg. Using a rolling pin, carefully drape the reserved sheet of dough on top of the mounds, pressing down firmly between the pockets of filling to push out any trapped air. Use a serrated ravioli cutter, a pastry cutter, or a sharp knife, cut the ravioli into squares. Transfer the ravioli to a floured kitchen towel to rest for 1 hour before cooking.

You will need about 4 quarts water and 3 tablespoons of salt for every 13 to 18 ounces of fresh or dried pasta. It is the large volume of water that will prevent the pasta from sticking together. Bring the salted water to a boil in a large pot or saucepan. Throw the pasta into the water. Stir the pasta immediately after you add it to the water and perhaps once again. Stir the pasta only once or twice. If you’ve used enough water and you stir the pasta as it goes in, it shouldn’t stick.

DO NOT COVER the pot or the water will boil over. Quickly bring the pasta back to a rolling boil, stir, and boil until al dente, or firm to the bite, about 2 minutes. The pasta should not have a hard center or be soggy and floppy. If following a specified cooking time, calculate it from the moment the pasta starts to boil again and have a colander ready for draining.

Drain the pasta, holding back 2 to 3 tablespoons of the cooking water. Return the pasta to the pan (the dissolved starch in the water helps the sauce cling to the pasta). Dress the pasta straight away with the sauce directly in the pan. (The Italian way is ALWAYS to toss the cooked, hot pasta with the sauce before serving.) Serve the hot pasta immediately with your favorite sauce. Even a copious drizzle of olive oil or melted butter—cooked just to the point of taking on a slightly nutty, toasty brown tinge—and a smattering of fresh herbs constitutes a sauce when the pasta is as tender and tasty as this.

How To Color Homemade Pasta Dough

Spinach Follow the Basic Pasta Dough recipe. Sift the flour onto a clean work surface. Next, puree 3/4 cup frozen cooked leaf spinach (squeezed to remove as much moisture as possible) in a food processor. Add it to the well in the flour. Continue as per the Basic Pasta Dough method.

Tomato Follow the Basic Pasta Dough recipe. Add 2 tablespoons store-bought or homemade tomato paste or sun-dried tomato paste to the well in the flour. Continue as per the Basic Pasta Dough recipe.

Beet Follow the Basic Pasta Dough recipe. Roast 1 red beet until softened, about 45 minutes. Let cool. Peel and grate or puree in a food processor. Add 2 tablespoons grated cooked beet to the well in the flour. Continue as per the Basic Pasta Dough recipe.

Saffron Pasta Follow the Basic Pasta Dough recipe. Soak 1 sachet of powdered saffron in 2 tablespoons hot water for 15 minutes. Strain the water, discarding the solids. Whisk the eggs with the vibrant saffron water before adding to the well in the flour. Continue as per the Basic Pasta Dough recipe.

Herb Follow the Basic Pasta Dough recipe. Add at least 3 tablespoons finely chopped fresh green herbs to the well in the flour.

Black squid ink pasta Follow the Basic Pasta Dough recipe. Add 1 sachet squid ink to the eggs and whisk to combine before adding to the flour. You may need to add a little extra flour to the pasta dough.

Recipe Testers' Reviews

This is a straightforward, lovely, easy, basic homemade pasta dough recipe. I made it with my 9-year-old granddaughter, who became a master of cranking the pasta machine.

I hunted down the Italian 00 flour and the farina di semola so that we could test the proper flours. I also used large eggs instead of medium. It took only 1 to 2 minutes of kneading the dough. We made the basic medium-wide noodles, and will make the pasta dough again to try some of the other shapes. All in all, it was a great hit for dinner with a hint of butter, chopped Italian flat-leaf parsley, and freshly grated cheese. It’s definitely a keeper.

This is a homemade pasta dough recipe that works.

I used a 50/50 mix of Italian 00 flour and semolina. I also used large eggs. It took some kneading to get the dough to come together at first, so I can see how one might need extra water if medium eggs are used. I only kneaded it for 5 minutes and after that the dough was stiff but cohesive—there were no hanging straggly parts or anything like that. I find pasta dough benefits hugely from a rest so I didn’t knead it any further. This is also the first time I’ve seen the suggestion of rubbing olive oil over dough before resting. I don’t know if that’s what made everything nice and soft, or if it was the rest itself, but the dough ended up smooth and supple.

I did have to use the thickest setting of the pasta roller for the first pass (I used my KitchenAid attachment, not the manual crank one), but after that the homemade pasta dough rolled out very nicely, even when using the second-thinnest setting. I cut half the pasta into fettuccine using the attachment, while the other half I hand-cut into tagliatelle. The sheets seemed to dry faster than I’m used to, but that could’ve been due to the weather, as it was a little warm and dry in the kitchen.

The recipe headnote says that for every egg used, you’ll end up with about 1 entree portion of pasta. I ended up with enough pasta to serve 4 people—and we were hungry! It took 2 minutes for the noodles to cook al dente after the water came back to a boil.

Fresh pasta is always great, and this didn’t disappoint. There’s a nice bite to the noodles, and they’re not heavy on the egg flavor. It’s the first time I’ve made pasta using the flour-well method (I usually whiz it together in a food processor) and it worked really well. We ate some of it buttered with Parmesan and some with spinach and cream.

This recipe yielded beautiful pasta with a delicate texture. This dough made beautiful pasta which my family thoroughly enjoyed. I will definitely make this again.

I didn't have 00 pasta flour on hand, so I used a regular AP flour and large eggs. My pasta dough was initially very dry and wasn't coming together very well. With the addition a few drops of water at a time (about 1/4 cup total), the pasta dough finally came together. I kneaded it for about 5 to 7 minutes and still wasn't sure if the dough was going to be too dry, but I massaged the outside of the dough with a little olive oil and popped it into a resealable plastic bag. Half an hour later, I had a mound of homemade pasta dough that felt ready to work with. The rest time really did help.

This homemade pasta dough recipe was my first attempt at semolina pasta made from scratch and I was very pleased with the results.

I used half 00 flour and half semolina and adjusted the recipe for flavored pasta. I added 2 tbsp pureed carrots and it was delicious with spicy sausage and a creamy tomato sauce. The pasta dried much more quickly than egg pasta, which made cutting it into linguine (using my Kitchen Aid attachment) much easier as there was no sticking. I can't wait to try other flavors!

The homemade pasta dough came together beautifully, though next time I’d omit the oil. After a 5-minute knead, the dough was smooth and elastic, but needed a little rest. When I rolled it out in the pasta maker, it was beautiful to work with.

Though the recipe suggests you send the whole thing through the machine at once, I found it much easier to divide the dough into 6 walnut-size pieces. I then cut the sheets into pappardelle, but when cooking I pulled the noodles out before they were ready, at about 5 minutes, then sautéed them in a pan with ramp bulbs, butter, and a bit of the cooking water. I served this with toasted bread crumbs, and loads of cheese.

I’d totally make this again—this homemade pasta dough was so effortless that I’d only bother freezing this if I was making stuffed pasta, like ravioli. In my testing, I doubled the recipe and used half semolina flour. I also had some ramps, so I blanched the greens and used them like you would in the recipe’s spinach variation. The amount of ramp greens I had was well under the 3 to 4 cups of spinach called for, but the bossy flavor of the ramps more than made up for it. The color was a pale mint green with flecks.

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Comments

Hi! I was wondering if it’s possible to make & cut the pasta ahead of time? And if so, how would you recommend storing it? Thanks so much for this great recipe — it’s become one of our go-to’s!

Thanks, Bryn! I’m so pleased that you love this. You can make the pasta ahead of time. If it’s just a few hours ahead of time, you can lay it on a baking sheet and dust with flour, cover with plastic wrap and store in the fridge. Any longer than that, I’d recommend freezing it. Coat in flour (if using long strands you can make little nests) and stash in a resealable plastic bag and freeze.


Best posh pasta recipes

Looking for a pasta dinner recipe to serve at a dinner party? Our impressive pasta recipes are easy to make but are ideal for Italian themed dinner party, a special lunch or even a date. Try our delicious posh pasta dinner recipes to really impress without too much hassle.

Homemade butternut ravioli with brown butter and sage

Learn how to make the silkiest, smoothest dough to create out-of-this-world pasta at home, with step-by-step tips from our cookery team.

Crab pappardelle arrabbiata

Make this fuss-free impressive pasta dish with fresh crabmeat and homemade confit chilli oil from 26 Grains in Covent Garden.

Macadamia pesto pappardelle

Ramp up your classic pine nut pesto with toasted macadamias and toss through long ribbons of pappardelle. Make this for an easy yet impressive weekend pasta recipe.

Lamb ragu pappardelle

Check out chef Louis Korovilas’s melt-in-the-mouth pappardelle with indulgent lamb ragu. This easy yet impressive recipe comes from Italian restaurant Bancone in Covent Garden. We have a full dinner party menu from Bancone here…

Vincisgrassi (pasta baked with parma ham)

Vincisgrassi, a type of baked pasta, comes from the region of Le Marche in Italy. It’s attributed to both General Windischgrätz (who fought Napoleon at Ancona), and to princisgrassi (meaning fat for the prince). In either case it’s very rich – some versions being even richer with the addition of sweetbreads and a pasta dough made with vin santo or marsala.

Baked lobster fideo pasta

Try this baked lobster fideo from David Gingell of Western’s Laundry, one of London’s hottest new restaurants. This recipe not only looks impressive, it’s packed with flavour too. It may take a little bit of effort but it’s definitely worth it. Try our full Western’s Laundry menu here…

Slow and low goat ragu with orecchiette

Check out this rich and flavoursome melt-in-the-mouth goat ragu served with al dente orecchiette pasta and a topping of nutty parmesan. This may take a little time but you’re sure to impress your friends and family at your next dinner party.

Cauliflower and fontina cannelloni

This recipe for cauliflower and fontina cannelloni comes from the chefs at Cantino Corvino, London. It’s a delicious, comforting pasta dish that’s great for a vegetarian dinner party (try our other recipes here).

Prawn orecchiette with roasted-shell olive oil

Check out our easy orecchiette recipe with large juicy prawns and punchy chilli. Impress your friends with this simple yet flavour packed pasta recipe this weekend.

Duck livers with caramelised onions, red wine vinegar sauce and pappardelle

This pasta recipe has bold flavours from duck livers and sweet caramelised onions. Duck livers make a simple, rustic sauce, perfect for a wintery dinner.

Linguine with samphire and prawns

The best recipe for samphire. This easy dish is made with linguine and pairs the sea vegetable samphire with king prawns in a super-quick pasta sauce that looks really impressive. Looking for linguine recipes? Try one of our favourites here…

Spaghetti with chorizo and rosemary pangritata

Check out this quick and easy spaghetti recipe with crispy chorizo and crunchy pangritata. Pangritata, sometimes called poor man’s parmesan, is a mix of fried breadcrumbs and herbs used add flavour and texture to pasta dishes.

Seafood fideuà

Fideuà is a Spanish dish similar to paella that uses short strands of pasta instead of rice. If you can’t find fideuà, break angel hair pasta into short pieces.

Pheasant ragu for pasta

A great introduction to pheasant: and makes a special sauce for pasta. This pheasant ragu goes well with tagliatelle for an impressive dinner party dish for friends.

Open spinach and ricotta ravioli

This classic blend of flavours is a favourite for a reason. Making it an open ravioli means that it’s quick and easy too, while it looks really impressive for a dinner party. Use dried pasta if you can’t find fresh, and cook according to packet instructions.

Posh porcini lasagne

Our posh porcini lasagne recipe is easy to make, vegetarian and feeds a crowd, perfect for family dinners or easy entertaining. Try our other vegetarian lasagne recipes here…

Angel hair pasta with lobster

Impress at your dinner party with lobster. Lobster tails are a good value way to buy lobster, though if you have access to whole lobster add the claw meat to the recipe as well.

Spaghetti alle vongole

Vongole or clams make a classic Italian pasta dinner tossed with linguine and herbs. The clams are cooked in dry white wine, which combined with the natural clam juice make a lovely rich sauce for the pasta. Serve as a smart main for 2 or a starter for 4.

Saffron mussels with orzo & tomatoes

This recipe for saffron mussels with orzo & tomatoes is really easy – it’s a one-pot – and takes under and hour but it looks fantastic and is packed full of delicious flavours. It’s a great new way to make the most of mussels and tomatoes.

Beef shin macaroni

This epic slow-cooked beef dish comes from legendary London steak house, Hawksmoor. Beef shin is cooked in red wine and stock until meltingly tender then macaroni and cheese is added and baked to golden, bubbly perfection. Make one of our macaroni cheese recipes from our collection here…

Crab and saffron linguine

Feeling fancy? Impress with this sophisticated linguine dish, flecked with fresh crabmeat, red chilli, lemon zest and saffron.


Homemade Pasta

Hi Guys! Today we have a fun recipe for you all…DIY pasta WITH four flavor variations and drying instructions! I really like making my own pasta (part of the DIY food obsession I have that I mentioned earlier this week), but it’s definitely a labor of love. These days I’m lucky enough to have a stand mixer to mix and bring my dough together, plus fancy pasta attachments to easily roll and cut my dough without having to demonstrate my pathetic arm strength, but these things are totally not necessary to make wonderful pasta at home!

We use a blend of all purpose and semolina flours because I like the firm texture the semolina adds to the dough and overall final product and all purpose flour is usually something everyone has on hand. You can get all authentic and serious if you want and pick up or order (via the internets) some 󈫰 flour” (doppio zero flour) which is an Italian flour that is is great for pasta and pizza doughs because of its fine texture, which when used results in a silky, supple dough. I have used it a couple times (specifically ones with lower protein %, because I blend my flour with semolina) and did quite enjoy it, but again I don’t think it’s necessary to go out of your way to find and buy 󈫰 flour” (which can be rather expensive) if you just want to make a quick dough. There are many purists out there who would disagree with me so it’s really up to you!

We included basic drying instructions because I began to notice that almost every time I would make my own pasta, I was unable to use the entire ball of dough quick enough, before it would go bad. I like using the hang dry method over the nesting method because I like the thorough and even drying you achieve where as with the nesting method it’s easier to develop mold due to improper “coiling” and unseen wet spots. If you don’t have a pasta drying rack, you can always use wire hangers, which is what I did for a couple years before finally investing $20 into a wooden drying rack.


Place a 2-quart saucepan over medium heat. Add the water, milk, chicken bouillon cubes, butter, pasta, garlic powder, parsley, and pepper. Bring to a boil then turn the heat down to a simmer. Cook, uncovered, for 15 minutes or until the pasta is tender.

Remove the pan from the heat and place a cover on it. Let it sit for 5 minutes for the sauce to thicken a bit more. Stir before serving.

Variations: add 1 cup chopped cooked chicken, turkey, drained tuna or other meat. Make it into stroganoff by adding browned and drained ground beef and using beef bouillon cubes instead of chicken and stirring in 1/4 cup sour cream before serving.


Paccheri Pasta with Braised Chicken and Saffron Cream

Sprinkle chicken with salt and pepper. Heat oil in heavy large skillet over medium-high heat. Add chicken, skin side down, to skillet and cook until golden, about 7 minutes per side. Transfer chicken to plate. Add onions and garlic to drippings in skillet sauté until onions are slightly softened, 7 to 8 minutes. Add wine and saffron to skillet bring to boil. Continue to boil until liquid is thickened and reduced by less than half, about 8 minutes. Add 2 cups chicken broth to skillet. Return chicken to skillet bring to boil. Reduce heat to low. Cover simmer gently until chicken is very tender (adjust heat to prevent boiling and turn chicken over after 30 minutes), about 1 hour total. Transfer chicken to plate and cool.

Step 2

Reserve skillet with juices. Remove skin and bones from chicken and discard. Tear chicken meat into bite-size pieces place in medium bowl and reserve.

Step 3

Cook pasta in pot of boiling salted water until just tender but still firm to bite, stirring occasionally. Drain return to pot.

Step 4

Meanwhile, spoon off fat from juices in skillet discard fat. Add cream to juices in skillet and boil until sauce is reduced to 2 1/2 cups and is thick enough to coat spoon, about 10 minutes. Stir in 2 tablespoons lemon juice, then chicken pieces. Stir over medium heat until heated through, adding more broth by 1/4 cupfuls to thin sauce as needed and adding more lemon juice by teaspoonfuls, if desired, about 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Add chicken mixture to pasta in pot and toss to coat. Stir in basil. Transfer pasta to plates.



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