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Cheese Pastry (Fatayer Jebneh)


Proof the yeast by mixing it with the sugar and water in a cup. (The yeast should foam and bubble; if it doesn’t, replace it with a new packet.) In a bowl, whisk together the flour and baking powder until combined.

Add the oil and then rub it into the flour mix with your fingertips. Add the yogurt and the water-yeast mixture and knead the dough until it forms a smooth soft ball that doesn’t stick to your hands. Lift the dough and slam it into the table 7-10 times during kneading. (This will give your baked goods a fluffy interior — a tip I learned from a bakery owner.)

Coat a bowl with a little olive oil, place the dough in it, and cover the dough with a clean towel or plastic wrap. Leave it in a warm place until it doubles in size. (If you are short on time, preheat the oven to 400 degrees and place the rack in the middle. Turn the oven off. Place a clean, dry towel on the rack and place the bowl with the covered dough on the towel and leave it in the oven. It will double in size in 10-15 minutes.)

Cut the dough into egg-sized balls and cover them with a clean towel. Let rest for 10 minutes. Roll each dough ball into an elongated oval about 1/8-inch thick. In a bowl, combine the remaining ingredients to form the filling. Place about 2-3 tablespoons of the filling in the center of each oval.

Fold one end of the dough lengthwise halfway over the filling. Fold over the opposite side to meet and tuck underneath. There should be one pointy end now; press with your fingertips to seal.

Do the same with the opposite side, leaving a small opening in the center. Gently press the top folds to adhere the dough to the cheese (this helps to prevent the pastry boats from opening up when you bake them). Let rest for 10-15 minutes.

Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Brush the pastries with some olive oil to give them a beautiful golden color when they bake. Bake on the middle rack until the bottoms are golden brown, about 7-10 minutes. Turn the oven to broil, and then place under the broiler until the tops are golden brown, about 2-3 minutes.


Fatayer bil Jibneh | Savory Cheese Hand Pies

Usually served during breakfast, they are equally great to snack on throughout the day or devour with a cup of tea at an afternoon tea gathering not to mention the perfect party food

no forks or knives needed.

To prepare dough, whisk together flour, salt, baking powder, mahlab and black caraway seeds then set aside until ready to use.

Mahlab (mahlepi) is a baking spice made with the dried kernels of St Lucie’s cherries and can be found in Greek or Middle Eastern Markets. It is widely used in breads, pastries, cookies, cheese and milk puddings it adds a unique sweet floral flavor – tastes a bit like cherries, a bit like roses, and a bit like almonds – but has to be used sparingly because too much of it turns your pastry slightly bitter. Try to buy whole kernels instead of ground and grind them yourself as needed.

Start working on the dough as instructed in the recipe below I used a stand mixer with the paddle attachment to start off with then switched to the dough hook.

Knead to a non-sticky, medium-soft dough. Form into a ball, grease with a little bit of oil then cover with a damp cloth set aside 40-to-90 minutes until doubled.

Meanwhile prepare cheese filling and egg wash. If the brand of cheese that you are using is salty, as is the case sometimes with Nabulsi and Jibneh Mshallaleh , then wash in several changes of cold water to reduce the amount of salt and drain thoroughly on paper towels before use.

Aleppo pepper , also known as Halaby Biber, is crushed moderately hot sun-dried red chilies. If you cannot find it in your area use a combination of 4 parts sweet paprika and 1 part cayenne pepper.

Once dough is ready to use, transfer onto a clean working surface barely dusted with flour and divide into quarters. Further divide each quarter into eight pieces you should have a total of 32 pieces. Pinch the ends of each piece at the bottom to form balls. Cover loosely with plastic wrap and set aside 10-to-15 minutes.

Work with one dough ball at a time and flatten each into a 5”x3.5” oval shape. Evenly spread about a heaped tablespoon cheese mixture over dough leaving a 1/2”-to-3/4” border. Fold the long sides over filling and pinch ends tightly to seal creating a boat-like shape. Transfer onto a baking sheet covered with parchment paper or silpat. Cover with a piece of wax paper and slightly press to flatten edges your assembled pastry should be about 5”x2 1/4” in size.

Repeat until all pieces are shaped. Lightly brush with egg wash and set aside 20-to-25 minutes.

Bake in a preheated 385F oven for about 15 minutes until slightly golden. Serve warm or at room temperature.

FATAYER BIL JIBNEH | SAVORY CHEESE HAND PIES

Print this recipe

Dough
5 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
1-to-1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1-to-1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
3/4-to-1 teaspoon mahlab
1-to-1 1/2 teaspoons black caraway seeds
3 tablespoons tepid water
1 tablespoon instant yeast
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1/2 cup yoghurt
1-to-2 tablespoons olive oil
1/4 cup safflower oil
1/2-to-1 cup tepid milk, as needed

Filling
2 cups Nabulsi cheese (or Queso Blanco)
1 cup Halloumi cheese (or any high-melting point semi-soft white cheese)
1 cup Armenian Chechil or Jibneh Mshallaleh braided string cheese (or Oaxaca cheese, mozzarella)
6-to-8 green onions, sliced
2 1/2-to-4 tablespoons fresh parsley, coarsely minced
2 egg whites
1 1/4 teaspoons baking powder
A little dry mint and Aleppo pepper

Egg wash
2 egg yolks
1 tablespoon water
1 or 2 drops lemon juice

Prepare dough. In a bowl, whisk together flour, salt, baking powder, mahlab and black caraway seeds set aside.

Add water into your mixer bowl and whisk in yeast and sugar until dissolved let proof 10-to-15 minutes until bubbly. To the same bowl add yoghurt, olive oil, safflower oil and about ½ cup milk mix on low to combine. Gradually incorporate the flour mixture as you mix on low using the paddle attachment adding the rest of the milk towards the end as needed. Switch to the dough hook and knead to a non-sticky, medium-soft dough. Form into a ball, grease with a little bit of oil then cover with a damp cloth set aside 40-to-90 minutes until doubled.

Prepare filling. Process cheese in a food processor, crumble or dice until it resembles coarse breadcrumbs do this before you measure into cups. Blend all three cheeses together with remaining filling ingredients set aside until ready to use.

Prepare egg wash. Combine egg yolks, water and lemon juice in a bowl and whisk to blend.

Assemble pastry. Transfer dough onto a clean working surface barely dusted with flour and divide into quarters. Further divide each quarter into eight pieces you should have a total of 32 pieces. Pinch the ends of each piece at the bottom to form balls. Cover loosely with plastic wrap and set aside 10-to-15 minutes.

Work with one dough ball at a time and flatten each into a 5”x3.5” oval shape. Evenly spread about a heaped tablespoon cheese mixture over dough leaving a 1/2”-to-3/4” border. Fold the long sides over filling and pinch ends tightly to seal creating a boat-like shape. Transfer onto a baking sheet covered with parchment paper or silpat. Cover with a piece of wax paper and slightly press to flatten edges your assembled pastry should be about 5”x2 1/4” in size. Repeat until all pieces are shaped. Lightly brush with egg wash and set aside 20-to-25 minutes.

Bake in a preheated 385F oven for about 15 minutes until slightly golden. Serve warm or at room temperature.


Notes

Water amount in the dough
The amount of water required differs with the type of flour and the type of yogurt that you use, start with 1 cup , if the dough is still dry and crumbly add water slowly while kneading till you get a smooth elastic dough (you may require 1/4 to 1/2 extra cups but remember, add them slowly)

Can I add other greens to the spinach pastry stuffing? Yes, you can replace part of the spinach with oregano, collard green or kale

Lemon juice or citric acid traditionally these spinach fatayer were made with lemon juice and consumed immediately. The problem with using lemon juice if that it makes the filling wet and this can cause the pastry triangles to open during baking or to turn slightly soggy if you store them for a couple of days. To get the tart taste without the extra fluid you can use citric acid. Citric acid is a week organic acid that is used to add a tart or sour taste to food and it is used to acidify milk in cheese making.

Tart or mild the use of sumac, citric acid or lemon juice is meant to add a tart taste to the spinach filling. You can make these spinach triangles without them and enjoy a mild fatayer. If you choose to use them, the amount is up to your taste. The amounts in the recipe are suggestions. Add them little by little and adjust the amounts according to your taste.

Shapes: You can shape these fatayer or pastry in any shape you like. Any form that encloses the filling is fine.Here is one more suggestion on how to fold them

The size: you can make these triangles small if you plan on serving them to guests or at a party. You can also make them big if you like. It is up to your taste


RECIPE: Kanafeh, Arabic Cheese Pastry

Ramadan 2011 begins after sunset on July 31st. One of the many luscious traditional pastries served during the night meals of Ramadan month is kanafeh. Subtly flavored with lemon and rosewater, doused with syrup, it makes up for all the calories burnt off during the daytime fast. Serve it with Turkish coffee.

Another lovely Arabic pastry for Ramadan break-fast or any time, is date-stuffed ma’moul cookies. Substitute dates for the nuts in the recipe, for dates are said to be the first food Muhammad ate when he broke his fast.

Kanafeh isn’t hard to make at home. The steps are simple and the ingredients widely available. If the classic kanaifa dough isn’t to be found in your area, substitute angel-hair (vermicelli) noodles. The trick is to massage the dough strands with melted butter – patience is required.

What I think is that it’s probably really good reflexology therapy, as the dough gently presses reflex points while you squeeze it. And the butter should leave you with the softest hands… But eaters won’t be concerned with the thoughts of the cook once they put a spoonful of kanafeh in their mouths. They’ll just want more kanafeh.

If you don’t care to skim the milk solids off the melted butter, the kanafeh will be white. For that appetizing golden color, the solids must be skimmed off. Don’t worry about removing some of the butter along with the milk solids.

Kanafeh sold in pastry shops is a bright orange color, contrasting with the green of chopped pistachios. It comes from a few drops of food coloring. I suggest you just enjoy the kanefeh without the food coloring.

You’ll need a large bowl, a spoon, a 10″ pie pan or round, flat baking pan, and a serving plate large enough to take the finished cake when inverted onto it.

For fine-noodle dough:
1 package defrosted Kataifi noodles (found in Middle Eastern grocery stores) or fine vermicelli
1 cup – 200 grams butter, melted and milk solids skimmed off

Butter, for greasing baking pan

For Syrup:
1-1/2 cup sugar
1 cup water
Juice of 1/2 lemon
1 teaspoon rose water

For Filling:
3 1/3 cup – 800 grams ricotta cheese

For Topping:
1/4 cup each blanched, chopped almonds and crushed pistachios
5 tablespoons chopped walnuts

Mix the ingredients for the sugar syrup in a saucepan. Bring to a boil and simmer for 15 – 20 minutes.
Allow to cool. Add rosewater, mix, and set aside.

Pre -heat the oven to 350°F – 180° C.

Shred the kataifi dough into the large bowl. Twist and break off the strands with your hands.

Pour the melted butter into the shredded kataifi dough and mix in thoroughly, using your hands to coat every strand.

Grease the baking pan with butter. Place half the dough at the bottom. Press it in firmly, leaving a rim of 1 cm. around.

Spread the cheese all over.

Spread the other half of the dough, over the cheese, this time pressing into place gently.

Bake for about 30-40 minutes until the surface is golden- brown.

Remove from oven and pour sugar syrup all over the hot kanafeh. Allow to cool completely.

Invert on to serving plate.

Sprinkle nuts all over. If you wish, cut squares or lozenge shapes and decorate the centers with small piles of the pistachios.

Serve the kanafeh warm, with coffee.

Need something savory to serve before the kanafeh? Green Prophet has those recipes:


Ingredients

    For Homemade Cheese
  • 3 liter Milk
  • 3 tablespoons Lemon juice
  • 1/4 teaspoon Salt For Jibney Filling
  • 1/4 cup Feta Cheese , crumbled
  • 1 teaspoon Kalonji (Onion Nigella Seeds)
  • 1 teaspoon Black pepper corns , coarsely pounded
  • 2 Stalk Spring Onion (Bulb & Greens) , finely chopped
  • 1/4 cup Parsley leaves , finely chopped
  • 3 sprigs Mint Leaves (Pudina) , finely chopped
  • Salt , to taste For the dough
  • 1-1/2 cups All Purpose Flour (Maida)
  • 1 teaspoon Active dry yeast
  • 1/4 teaspoon Salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon Sugar
  • 2 tablespoon Curd (Dahi / Yogurt)
  • 1 tablespoons Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • Lukewarm Water , as required For cream wash
  • 1/4 cup Fresh cream , whisked well

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Impress Your Entire Household With Joanna Gaines's Deceptively Simple Fatayer Recipe

Ever have those cravings for something warm, salty, and buttery, but aren't quite sure what to make? Joanna Gaines's fatayer can fix that! The recipe, which Gaines made on the first episode of her new cooking show, Magnolia Table, is a classic Lebanese meat pie, and it'll satisfy all of your tastebuds.

While I was initially a little worried that these savory pastries might be too far out of my cooking skills comfort zone, I was surprised just how simple they were to put together. The filling is as easy as sautéing a few ingredients in a pan, and the outer pastry is made from Pillsbury Grands! Southern Homestyle Original Biscuits. And since the biscuits are already portioned, all you have to do is roll them, fill them, and close them. After brushing a little melted butter over the top, they're ready to go in the oven.


The recipe makes 24 fatayer, which correlates roughly to 8-10 servings. Don't worry if you can't eat them all in one night though, as they reheat nicely for a treat throughout the week. And if you're looking to make a full meal out of it, I recommend Gaines's Lebanese Salad as the perfect side dish.


581.Fatayer Jebneh(White cheese pastries)#BreadBakers

Fatayer Jebneh or cheese pastries are popular pastries sold in the Middle Eastern countries. They are called pastries or pies but unlike the western world pies which are made with flour and fat, these are made with a yeast dough. These pastries are popular street food served in Egypt, Lebanon and Middle East countries. The origin of these pastries is unknown as each country claims it as their own.
The yeast dough has yogurt and baking powder added to it to make it soft. The filling for fatayer can be cheese (Jebneh), meat or spinach. The shape too varies. They can be cigar shaped, round, triangle or boat shaped.
The cheese fatayers are usually filled with akkawi, a salty, chewy cheese that originates from Palestine mixed with a little bit of cheddar and kashkaval cheese. However if these cheeses are not available one can combine feta, mozzarella or ricotta with some cheddar cheese. Spices usually that are used to flavour the filling are nigella seeds or zaatar or a combination of cayenne and paprika powder. Herbs used are usually coriander, flat parsley or mint.
I had this recipe bookmarked ever since I came across it on Saswan’s blog ‘Chef in Disguise’. Dinner guests and Sue of Palatable Pastime‘s suggestion to use any kind of peppers—fresh, dried, ground, sweet or hot, the three just fell into the slot perfectly. One more bookmarked recipe done, followed Sue’s suggested theme for August and happy guests. What more can I ask for. Sue thank you for an interesting theme.
Must admit when I read peppers for the Bread Bakers’ theme, the Indian in me was calling out for a hot hot hot bread… not temperature wise but taste wise. However, had to hold back and just put a wee bit as kids too were my dinner guests.
I used a combination of feta (as we don’t get akkawi), mozzarella and cheddar cheese. I added both fresh coriander and mint to the filling and sprinkled a combination of cayenne and paprika powders along with some sesame seeds.


FATAYER JEBNEH (WHITE CHEESE PASTRIES)
Makes 10 big pieces or 24 small ones

For the dough (pastry):
3 cups plain flour (all purpose flour)
¼ cup olive oil
¼ cup yogurt (room temperature)
1 tsp baking powder
1 tbsp instant dry active yeast
1 tsp sugar
½ tsp salt
¾ -1 cup warm water

For the filling:
100g feta cheese
100g mozzarella cheese
100g cheddar cheese
2-3 tbsp chopped fresh coriander
1 tbsp chopped fresh mint
½ tsp cayenne pepper
2 tsp paprika powder
2 tbsp sesame seeds( or nigella seeds)
milk or olive oil for brushing

extra flour for dusting
extra oil for greasing

Preparation of the dough:

  1. Mix flour, salt, baking powder, sugar and yeast in a big bowl.
  2. Add olive oil and rub into the flour.
  3. Mix water and yogurt. Use the mixture to form a dough.
  4. Knead the dough till it becomes smooth and doesn’t stick to your hands.
  5. Grease the bowl and dough with oil and cover it with a tea towel or cling film.
  6. Let the dough rise till double in size.
  1. Crumble or grate the feta cheese.
  2. Grate mozzarella and cheddar cheese.
  3. Mix the cheeses.
  4. Mix paprika and cayenne powders.
  5. Add coriander, mint and a bit of the mixed pepper powder to the cheese.
  6. Mix well.
  1. Divide the dough into 20 parts. Roll each part into a ball.
  2. Using a bit of extra flour roll one part into a 8cm X 10cm oval.
  3. Put a tablespoonful of the filling in the middle.
  4. Fold one edge of partially over the filling.
  5. Fold the other part but not covering the filling. The ends of both folds should overlap.
  6. Press the ends.It should look like a boat.
  7. Repeat steps 2-6 with the remaining dough balls.
  8. Place the fatayer on a greased or lined baking tray.
  9. Let the dough rise for 20-25 minutes.
  10. Preheat the oven to 180° C.
  11. Brush the tops of the fatayer with milk or olive oil.
  12. Sprinkle sesame seeds over the dough part.
  13. Bake the fatayers for 15-20 minutes or till they are light golden in colour.
  14. Remove the fatayers from the oven and cool them on the wire rack.
  15. Sprinkle the remaining paprika cayenne powder mixture over the cheese part while still hot.
  16. Enjoy them with mint tea, coffee or some soup.
  • Adding yogurt and baking powder makes the dough more soft and pliable.
  • Shape them into triangles, round or cigar shapes.
  • Use zaatar instead of the coriander and mint. Can use dried coriander and mint.
  • Add the pepper powders according to your taste. I used half quantity in the filling and half to sprinkle over. My cayenne pepper was not too hot.
    by Basic N Delicious by Seduce Your Tastebuds by Sara’s Tasty Buds by Ambrosia by Herbivore Cucina by Food Lust People Love by Karen’s Kitchen Stories by Mayuri’s Jikoni by Hezzi-D’s Books and Cooks by Magnolia Days by Cook’s Hideout by Hostess At Heart by Baking Sense by The Bread She Bakes by Cindy’s Recipes and Writings by Sizzling Tastebuds by A Shaggy Dough Story by Spiceroots by Passion Kneaded by Gayathri’s Cook Spot by My Cooking Journey by Palatable Pastime

#BreadBakers is a group of bread loving bakers who get together once a month to bake bread with a common ingredient or theme. Follow our Pinterest board right here. Links are also updated each month on this home page.


Fatayer

Fatayer or fitiir are one of the most famous mezzes of Lebanese cuisine. This little turnover stuffed with spinach is an integral part of Arabian cuisine and is mainly eaten in Turkey and in all the countries from the Middle East that were part of the Ottoman Empire, including Syria, Egypt, Jordan and other countries in the region, such as Iraq and Israel.

What is fatayer?

In Arabic, fatayer (فطائر) means “pie”. The recipe presented here is the spinach pie called sabāniq in Lebanon, but the fatayer can also be stuffed with meat or sweet cheese or cottage cheese and is called jibna or jibna beyda respectively.

For the dough of the fatayer, there are two options: the first recommends a dough between the puff pastry and the shortcrust pastry and the second includes baker’s yeast and is closer to pizza dough.

Related Posts:

Spinach is deliciously scented with cumin, paprika, lemon and of course with the must-have sumac, a spice commonly used in Middle Eastern cuisines.

Mezzes

They change their name, they change their form. Sometimes they are so similar that it is not possible to trace their origins. Mezzes are the glory of the tables of all the Eastern Mediterranean region, but especially of Lebanon.

The origin of the name is controversial: from the Arabic word mzaza from the verb tamazzaza (to taste small bites, but also to drink a glass in small sips)? Persian maza (flavor)? Turkish mezze, which indicates the “table” and, by extension, the many dishes that garnish it?

The first origin is attested since the thirteenth century in Lisân al-‘Arab, a dictionary of the Arabic language completed by Ibn Manzur in 1290.

In any case, these little bites are just what the mezzes are all about, as much as Spanish tapas or Italian antipasti.

From the Balkans to the Red Sea, through Greece, Turkey and Syria, the table is a festive composition of tiny dishes, but the triumph of the meze is celebrated in Lebanon, a country where all the culinary culture finds all its expression in about fifty small plates and in which the level of refinement and variety of the mezze is unequaled.

Evidently, the common attachment to the Ottoman Empire created the “mezze civilization”, this Mediterranean branch that brings together people of different languages ​​and origins around multiple tastes.

Certainly this civilization has found its specificity in Lebanon, undoubtedly also favored by the fact that, even if it occupies a small territory, this country enjoys a climatic variety offering an enviable assortment of raw ingredients.

Everything is there: vegetable or animal, natural, cooked or preserved. And among the Lebanese, preserving and brining are definitely an art.

Thus, among the Lebanese mezzes, you find all kinds of preserved vegetables, especially in brine and to which are added oil and aromas: turnips and aubergines, cucumbers and zucchini, green beans and vine leaves, peppers and zucchini flower.

Drying plays a role in the preservation of legumes, so important in Middle Eastern cuisine, aromatic herbs and fruits, which are often the prelude to meze, a kind of appetizer before the starters.

On the table set with mezze, raw seasonal vegetables abound, alone or combined to form fresh salads those cooked (sautéed, fried, grilled) or puréed, like legumes: babaganoush, hummus, okra called beme (or bamia or abelmosco) cooked to perfection.

And of course the cereals: the burghul or bulgur in the first place, whether it is during the summer, in salads such as the famous tabbouleh, or during the winter in comforting soups, and always used for kibbehs, a kind of torpedo-shaped meat croquettes.

There are so many, like fattoush salad, sambousseks, falafels, all served with pita, to name a few.

These dozens of plates filled with colorful food scattered on the table, constitute a perfect metaphor of the Lebanese cultural mosaic, a tradition that brings us back to the old splendor of the court banquets of the Ottoman era, in the nineteenth century, during which a multitude of small plates were offered to the guests, who were to seduce the eye even before the palate, thanks to the different shapes and colors.

What is the origin of spinach?

Spinach originates from Asia, particularly from the west and the center of the continent. In fact, this vegetable was already known and used by the Arabs. Spinach appeared in Europe around the year 1000 when they were introduced to Spain after the conquest of this country by Moors fighters.

Later, it was also introduced in Italy, when the Saracens managed to conquer the Sicilian region. Of course, it was not only the Arabs who consumed it, but also all the other Asian peoples who used it both as a food and as a remedy for certain diseases, because this vegetable, according to their belief, also had medical properties and could therefore cure any illness or discomfort.

Contrary to popular belief, spinach, with its 2.8 mg of iron per 100 g of fresh leaves, is not at all the richest iron food. It has less than lentils or beans, for example. In addition, the human body absorbs iron of plant origin less than that of animal origin. Clams or oysters have a very high iron content, just like liver, kidneys or even red meat.

Why is spinach considered the king of iron?

The story goes back to 1870. That year, a German biochemist, E. von Wolf, evaluated the nutritional composition of foods. And rather than write in his tablets of results, the 2.8 mg of iron per 100 g of leaves, he mistakenly wrote 28 mg.

And that’s how, because of a comma error, spinach has become the king of iron. An error that was followed by a second, a few years later. A German scientist from the University of Basel, Gustav von Bunge, attributed the iron content in dried spinach to fresh spinach. Obviously, the iron content in dried spinach is higher than in the fresh ones.

Finally, icing on the cake for spinach, in the early twentieth century, the irresistible Popeye and his iron biceps when he swallows a box of spinach. The sailor with the pipe will definitively seal the deal and make spinach part of the iron pop culture!

There are several little turnovers in the cuisines around the world and 196 flavors is not short of original recipes: you may want to try the Latin American empanadas, the Algerian cocas, the Indian samosas, the Cape Verdean pastels, or Bolivian saltenas , which are all no less delicious bites than these excellent fatayer!