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Male vs. Female Bartender: Who Has It Tougher?


Bartenders, what do you think?

Male and female bartenders both deal with difficult, yet different situations.

What do you do for a living? Some argue that those who work with numbers have the hardest, most mind-numbing jobs. On the other hand, since they’re always working with angry customers, others claim that those who work in customer service have it the worst.

Whatever your job may be, take a moment and picture this: that same job, on a normal day… but everyone else is drunk. Things were looking a little bit better before than they are now, aren’t they?

No matter how tough your job may be or what you have to deal with on a day-to-day basis, bartenders have to deal with everyone when they’re drunk. Therefore, we’re going to go ahead and say that they have it the worst.

Now, here’s the real question: Who has it tougher, male or female bartenders?

You could really spin this either way. On one hand, it’s fair to assume that women are hit on more often than men. Nevertheless, this doesn’t mean that men aren’t hit on, or that either party (both male and female customers) wouldn’t take action after a few too many cocktails. Whether that “action” may be trying to flirt their way into a free drink, or other, inappropriate things, this is something both sexes constantly have to deal with.

Moral of the story? Bartenders have to deal with drunk people 24/7, so no matter how you spin it, their job isn’t easy.

Do you have an opinion on who has it worse? Let us know!


Turkey Buying Guide

These days, turkeys come fresh, frozen and somewhere in between. That "in between" category is courtesy of a recent USDA ruling on labeling. "Fresh" turkeys have to be stored at 26 degrees Fahrenheit or above frozen turkeys have to be stored at 0 degrees Fahrenheit or below. But what happens to the turkeys stored between one and 25 degrees Fahrenheit? There's no name for them some producers call them "refrigerated," while others call them "hard-chilled or "not previously frozen."

The National Turkey Federation says, "There is no quality difference between a fresh and frozen turkey." We can only assume they're also referring to "refrigerated" turkeys. However, freezing any meat has a disruptive effect on cell structure — when meat is frozen, the ice crystals that form around the cells can cause cell damage and fluid loss, ultimately resulting in drier meat.

Though modern flash freezing techniques minimize the damage done during freezing and thawing (it reduces the size of the ice crystals), many turkey manufacturers still hedge their bets by injecting a liquid "basting" solution of water, oil and seasoning prior to freezing. This basting solution is often high in sodium — it's essentially a brine and also imparts a flavor of its own. Such turkeys are often labeled "self-basting."

The flavor of a bird is determined by several additional factors, which may actually be more important than whether your turkey is fresh or frozen. Size is key — smaller birds tend to be more tender if you have a lot of guests coming, think about cooking two small turkeys instead of one large one. Gender plays a role too — female birds, known as hens, tend to be slaughtered younger (i.e., smaller) larger turkeys are typically males, known as toms or stags.

When choosing your turkey, also keep in mind that frozen turkeys take a long time to thaw — one day for every five pounds.

If you're hosting a small Thanksgiving, you should be able to easily find birds under nine pounds. If not, go with a turkey breast. If you're serving lots of sides, figure about one pound per person.

    Basted or Self-basting: These are whole birds that are injected with or marinated in a solution that, according to USDA specifications, includes "butter or other edible fat, broth, stock or water plus spices, flavor enhancers and other approved substances." This increases the moisture content in the meat however, it also masks the natural taste of the bird.


Turkey Buying Guide

These days, turkeys come fresh, frozen and somewhere in between. That "in between" category is courtesy of a recent USDA ruling on labeling. "Fresh" turkeys have to be stored at 26 degrees Fahrenheit or above frozen turkeys have to be stored at 0 degrees Fahrenheit or below. But what happens to the turkeys stored between one and 25 degrees Fahrenheit? There's no name for them some producers call them "refrigerated," while others call them "hard-chilled or "not previously frozen."

The National Turkey Federation says, "There is no quality difference between a fresh and frozen turkey." We can only assume they're also referring to "refrigerated" turkeys. However, freezing any meat has a disruptive effect on cell structure — when meat is frozen, the ice crystals that form around the cells can cause cell damage and fluid loss, ultimately resulting in drier meat.

Though modern flash freezing techniques minimize the damage done during freezing and thawing (it reduces the size of the ice crystals), many turkey manufacturers still hedge their bets by injecting a liquid "basting" solution of water, oil and seasoning prior to freezing. This basting solution is often high in sodium — it's essentially a brine and also imparts a flavor of its own. Such turkeys are often labeled "self-basting."

The flavor of a bird is determined by several additional factors, which may actually be more important than whether your turkey is fresh or frozen. Size is key — smaller birds tend to be more tender if you have a lot of guests coming, think about cooking two small turkeys instead of one large one. Gender plays a role too — female birds, known as hens, tend to be slaughtered younger (i.e., smaller) larger turkeys are typically males, known as toms or stags.

When choosing your turkey, also keep in mind that frozen turkeys take a long time to thaw — one day for every five pounds.

If you're hosting a small Thanksgiving, you should be able to easily find birds under nine pounds. If not, go with a turkey breast. If you're serving lots of sides, figure about one pound per person.

    Basted or Self-basting: These are whole birds that are injected with or marinated in a solution that, according to USDA specifications, includes "butter or other edible fat, broth, stock or water plus spices, flavor enhancers and other approved substances." This increases the moisture content in the meat however, it also masks the natural taste of the bird.


Turkey Buying Guide

These days, turkeys come fresh, frozen and somewhere in between. That "in between" category is courtesy of a recent USDA ruling on labeling. "Fresh" turkeys have to be stored at 26 degrees Fahrenheit or above frozen turkeys have to be stored at 0 degrees Fahrenheit or below. But what happens to the turkeys stored between one and 25 degrees Fahrenheit? There's no name for them some producers call them "refrigerated," while others call them "hard-chilled or "not previously frozen."

The National Turkey Federation says, "There is no quality difference between a fresh and frozen turkey." We can only assume they're also referring to "refrigerated" turkeys. However, freezing any meat has a disruptive effect on cell structure — when meat is frozen, the ice crystals that form around the cells can cause cell damage and fluid loss, ultimately resulting in drier meat.

Though modern flash freezing techniques minimize the damage done during freezing and thawing (it reduces the size of the ice crystals), many turkey manufacturers still hedge their bets by injecting a liquid "basting" solution of water, oil and seasoning prior to freezing. This basting solution is often high in sodium — it's essentially a brine and also imparts a flavor of its own. Such turkeys are often labeled "self-basting."

The flavor of a bird is determined by several additional factors, which may actually be more important than whether your turkey is fresh or frozen. Size is key — smaller birds tend to be more tender if you have a lot of guests coming, think about cooking two small turkeys instead of one large one. Gender plays a role too — female birds, known as hens, tend to be slaughtered younger (i.e., smaller) larger turkeys are typically males, known as toms or stags.

When choosing your turkey, also keep in mind that frozen turkeys take a long time to thaw — one day for every five pounds.

If you're hosting a small Thanksgiving, you should be able to easily find birds under nine pounds. If not, go with a turkey breast. If you're serving lots of sides, figure about one pound per person.

    Basted or Self-basting: These are whole birds that are injected with or marinated in a solution that, according to USDA specifications, includes "butter or other edible fat, broth, stock or water plus spices, flavor enhancers and other approved substances." This increases the moisture content in the meat however, it also masks the natural taste of the bird.


Turkey Buying Guide

These days, turkeys come fresh, frozen and somewhere in between. That "in between" category is courtesy of a recent USDA ruling on labeling. "Fresh" turkeys have to be stored at 26 degrees Fahrenheit or above frozen turkeys have to be stored at 0 degrees Fahrenheit or below. But what happens to the turkeys stored between one and 25 degrees Fahrenheit? There's no name for them some producers call them "refrigerated," while others call them "hard-chilled or "not previously frozen."

The National Turkey Federation says, "There is no quality difference between a fresh and frozen turkey." We can only assume they're also referring to "refrigerated" turkeys. However, freezing any meat has a disruptive effect on cell structure — when meat is frozen, the ice crystals that form around the cells can cause cell damage and fluid loss, ultimately resulting in drier meat.

Though modern flash freezing techniques minimize the damage done during freezing and thawing (it reduces the size of the ice crystals), many turkey manufacturers still hedge their bets by injecting a liquid "basting" solution of water, oil and seasoning prior to freezing. This basting solution is often high in sodium — it's essentially a brine and also imparts a flavor of its own. Such turkeys are often labeled "self-basting."

The flavor of a bird is determined by several additional factors, which may actually be more important than whether your turkey is fresh or frozen. Size is key — smaller birds tend to be more tender if you have a lot of guests coming, think about cooking two small turkeys instead of one large one. Gender plays a role too — female birds, known as hens, tend to be slaughtered younger (i.e., smaller) larger turkeys are typically males, known as toms or stags.

When choosing your turkey, also keep in mind that frozen turkeys take a long time to thaw — one day for every five pounds.

If you're hosting a small Thanksgiving, you should be able to easily find birds under nine pounds. If not, go with a turkey breast. If you're serving lots of sides, figure about one pound per person.

    Basted or Self-basting: These are whole birds that are injected with or marinated in a solution that, according to USDA specifications, includes "butter or other edible fat, broth, stock or water plus spices, flavor enhancers and other approved substances." This increases the moisture content in the meat however, it also masks the natural taste of the bird.


Turkey Buying Guide

These days, turkeys come fresh, frozen and somewhere in between. That "in between" category is courtesy of a recent USDA ruling on labeling. "Fresh" turkeys have to be stored at 26 degrees Fahrenheit or above frozen turkeys have to be stored at 0 degrees Fahrenheit or below. But what happens to the turkeys stored between one and 25 degrees Fahrenheit? There's no name for them some producers call them "refrigerated," while others call them "hard-chilled or "not previously frozen."

The National Turkey Federation says, "There is no quality difference between a fresh and frozen turkey." We can only assume they're also referring to "refrigerated" turkeys. However, freezing any meat has a disruptive effect on cell structure — when meat is frozen, the ice crystals that form around the cells can cause cell damage and fluid loss, ultimately resulting in drier meat.

Though modern flash freezing techniques minimize the damage done during freezing and thawing (it reduces the size of the ice crystals), many turkey manufacturers still hedge their bets by injecting a liquid "basting" solution of water, oil and seasoning prior to freezing. This basting solution is often high in sodium — it's essentially a brine and also imparts a flavor of its own. Such turkeys are often labeled "self-basting."

The flavor of a bird is determined by several additional factors, which may actually be more important than whether your turkey is fresh or frozen. Size is key — smaller birds tend to be more tender if you have a lot of guests coming, think about cooking two small turkeys instead of one large one. Gender plays a role too — female birds, known as hens, tend to be slaughtered younger (i.e., smaller) larger turkeys are typically males, known as toms or stags.

When choosing your turkey, also keep in mind that frozen turkeys take a long time to thaw — one day for every five pounds.

If you're hosting a small Thanksgiving, you should be able to easily find birds under nine pounds. If not, go with a turkey breast. If you're serving lots of sides, figure about one pound per person.

    Basted or Self-basting: These are whole birds that are injected with or marinated in a solution that, according to USDA specifications, includes "butter or other edible fat, broth, stock or water plus spices, flavor enhancers and other approved substances." This increases the moisture content in the meat however, it also masks the natural taste of the bird.


Turkey Buying Guide

These days, turkeys come fresh, frozen and somewhere in between. That "in between" category is courtesy of a recent USDA ruling on labeling. "Fresh" turkeys have to be stored at 26 degrees Fahrenheit or above frozen turkeys have to be stored at 0 degrees Fahrenheit or below. But what happens to the turkeys stored between one and 25 degrees Fahrenheit? There's no name for them some producers call them "refrigerated," while others call them "hard-chilled or "not previously frozen."

The National Turkey Federation says, "There is no quality difference between a fresh and frozen turkey." We can only assume they're also referring to "refrigerated" turkeys. However, freezing any meat has a disruptive effect on cell structure — when meat is frozen, the ice crystals that form around the cells can cause cell damage and fluid loss, ultimately resulting in drier meat.

Though modern flash freezing techniques minimize the damage done during freezing and thawing (it reduces the size of the ice crystals), many turkey manufacturers still hedge their bets by injecting a liquid "basting" solution of water, oil and seasoning prior to freezing. This basting solution is often high in sodium — it's essentially a brine and also imparts a flavor of its own. Such turkeys are often labeled "self-basting."

The flavor of a bird is determined by several additional factors, which may actually be more important than whether your turkey is fresh or frozen. Size is key — smaller birds tend to be more tender if you have a lot of guests coming, think about cooking two small turkeys instead of one large one. Gender plays a role too — female birds, known as hens, tend to be slaughtered younger (i.e., smaller) larger turkeys are typically males, known as toms or stags.

When choosing your turkey, also keep in mind that frozen turkeys take a long time to thaw — one day for every five pounds.

If you're hosting a small Thanksgiving, you should be able to easily find birds under nine pounds. If not, go with a turkey breast. If you're serving lots of sides, figure about one pound per person.

    Basted or Self-basting: These are whole birds that are injected with or marinated in a solution that, according to USDA specifications, includes "butter or other edible fat, broth, stock or water plus spices, flavor enhancers and other approved substances." This increases the moisture content in the meat however, it also masks the natural taste of the bird.


Turkey Buying Guide

These days, turkeys come fresh, frozen and somewhere in between. That "in between" category is courtesy of a recent USDA ruling on labeling. "Fresh" turkeys have to be stored at 26 degrees Fahrenheit or above frozen turkeys have to be stored at 0 degrees Fahrenheit or below. But what happens to the turkeys stored between one and 25 degrees Fahrenheit? There's no name for them some producers call them "refrigerated," while others call them "hard-chilled or "not previously frozen."

The National Turkey Federation says, "There is no quality difference between a fresh and frozen turkey." We can only assume they're also referring to "refrigerated" turkeys. However, freezing any meat has a disruptive effect on cell structure — when meat is frozen, the ice crystals that form around the cells can cause cell damage and fluid loss, ultimately resulting in drier meat.

Though modern flash freezing techniques minimize the damage done during freezing and thawing (it reduces the size of the ice crystals), many turkey manufacturers still hedge their bets by injecting a liquid "basting" solution of water, oil and seasoning prior to freezing. This basting solution is often high in sodium — it's essentially a brine and also imparts a flavor of its own. Such turkeys are often labeled "self-basting."

The flavor of a bird is determined by several additional factors, which may actually be more important than whether your turkey is fresh or frozen. Size is key — smaller birds tend to be more tender if you have a lot of guests coming, think about cooking two small turkeys instead of one large one. Gender plays a role too — female birds, known as hens, tend to be slaughtered younger (i.e., smaller) larger turkeys are typically males, known as toms or stags.

When choosing your turkey, also keep in mind that frozen turkeys take a long time to thaw — one day for every five pounds.

If you're hosting a small Thanksgiving, you should be able to easily find birds under nine pounds. If not, go with a turkey breast. If you're serving lots of sides, figure about one pound per person.

    Basted or Self-basting: These are whole birds that are injected with or marinated in a solution that, according to USDA specifications, includes "butter or other edible fat, broth, stock or water plus spices, flavor enhancers and other approved substances." This increases the moisture content in the meat however, it also masks the natural taste of the bird.


Turkey Buying Guide

These days, turkeys come fresh, frozen and somewhere in between. That "in between" category is courtesy of a recent USDA ruling on labeling. "Fresh" turkeys have to be stored at 26 degrees Fahrenheit or above frozen turkeys have to be stored at 0 degrees Fahrenheit or below. But what happens to the turkeys stored between one and 25 degrees Fahrenheit? There's no name for them some producers call them "refrigerated," while others call them "hard-chilled or "not previously frozen."

The National Turkey Federation says, "There is no quality difference between a fresh and frozen turkey." We can only assume they're also referring to "refrigerated" turkeys. However, freezing any meat has a disruptive effect on cell structure — when meat is frozen, the ice crystals that form around the cells can cause cell damage and fluid loss, ultimately resulting in drier meat.

Though modern flash freezing techniques minimize the damage done during freezing and thawing (it reduces the size of the ice crystals), many turkey manufacturers still hedge their bets by injecting a liquid "basting" solution of water, oil and seasoning prior to freezing. This basting solution is often high in sodium — it's essentially a brine and also imparts a flavor of its own. Such turkeys are often labeled "self-basting."

The flavor of a bird is determined by several additional factors, which may actually be more important than whether your turkey is fresh or frozen. Size is key — smaller birds tend to be more tender if you have a lot of guests coming, think about cooking two small turkeys instead of one large one. Gender plays a role too — female birds, known as hens, tend to be slaughtered younger (i.e., smaller) larger turkeys are typically males, known as toms or stags.

When choosing your turkey, also keep in mind that frozen turkeys take a long time to thaw — one day for every five pounds.

If you're hosting a small Thanksgiving, you should be able to easily find birds under nine pounds. If not, go with a turkey breast. If you're serving lots of sides, figure about one pound per person.

    Basted or Self-basting: These are whole birds that are injected with or marinated in a solution that, according to USDA specifications, includes "butter or other edible fat, broth, stock or water plus spices, flavor enhancers and other approved substances." This increases the moisture content in the meat however, it also masks the natural taste of the bird.


Turkey Buying Guide

These days, turkeys come fresh, frozen and somewhere in between. That "in between" category is courtesy of a recent USDA ruling on labeling. "Fresh" turkeys have to be stored at 26 degrees Fahrenheit or above frozen turkeys have to be stored at 0 degrees Fahrenheit or below. But what happens to the turkeys stored between one and 25 degrees Fahrenheit? There's no name for them some producers call them "refrigerated," while others call them "hard-chilled or "not previously frozen."

The National Turkey Federation says, "There is no quality difference between a fresh and frozen turkey." We can only assume they're also referring to "refrigerated" turkeys. However, freezing any meat has a disruptive effect on cell structure — when meat is frozen, the ice crystals that form around the cells can cause cell damage and fluid loss, ultimately resulting in drier meat.

Though modern flash freezing techniques minimize the damage done during freezing and thawing (it reduces the size of the ice crystals), many turkey manufacturers still hedge their bets by injecting a liquid "basting" solution of water, oil and seasoning prior to freezing. This basting solution is often high in sodium — it's essentially a brine and also imparts a flavor of its own. Such turkeys are often labeled "self-basting."

The flavor of a bird is determined by several additional factors, which may actually be more important than whether your turkey is fresh or frozen. Size is key — smaller birds tend to be more tender if you have a lot of guests coming, think about cooking two small turkeys instead of one large one. Gender plays a role too — female birds, known as hens, tend to be slaughtered younger (i.e., smaller) larger turkeys are typically males, known as toms or stags.

When choosing your turkey, also keep in mind that frozen turkeys take a long time to thaw — one day for every five pounds.

If you're hosting a small Thanksgiving, you should be able to easily find birds under nine pounds. If not, go with a turkey breast. If you're serving lots of sides, figure about one pound per person.

    Basted or Self-basting: These are whole birds that are injected with or marinated in a solution that, according to USDA specifications, includes "butter or other edible fat, broth, stock or water plus spices, flavor enhancers and other approved substances." This increases the moisture content in the meat however, it also masks the natural taste of the bird.


Turkey Buying Guide

These days, turkeys come fresh, frozen and somewhere in between. That "in between" category is courtesy of a recent USDA ruling on labeling. "Fresh" turkeys have to be stored at 26 degrees Fahrenheit or above frozen turkeys have to be stored at 0 degrees Fahrenheit or below. But what happens to the turkeys stored between one and 25 degrees Fahrenheit? There's no name for them some producers call them "refrigerated," while others call them "hard-chilled or "not previously frozen."

The National Turkey Federation says, "There is no quality difference between a fresh and frozen turkey." We can only assume they're also referring to "refrigerated" turkeys. However, freezing any meat has a disruptive effect on cell structure — when meat is frozen, the ice crystals that form around the cells can cause cell damage and fluid loss, ultimately resulting in drier meat.

Though modern flash freezing techniques minimize the damage done during freezing and thawing (it reduces the size of the ice crystals), many turkey manufacturers still hedge their bets by injecting a liquid "basting" solution of water, oil and seasoning prior to freezing. This basting solution is often high in sodium — it's essentially a brine and also imparts a flavor of its own. Such turkeys are often labeled "self-basting."

The flavor of a bird is determined by several additional factors, which may actually be more important than whether your turkey is fresh or frozen. Size is key — smaller birds tend to be more tender if you have a lot of guests coming, think about cooking two small turkeys instead of one large one. Gender plays a role too — female birds, known as hens, tend to be slaughtered younger (i.e., smaller) larger turkeys are typically males, known as toms or stags.

When choosing your turkey, also keep in mind that frozen turkeys take a long time to thaw — one day for every five pounds.

If you're hosting a small Thanksgiving, you should be able to easily find birds under nine pounds. If not, go with a turkey breast. If you're serving lots of sides, figure about one pound per person.

    Basted or Self-basting: These are whole birds that are injected with or marinated in a solution that, according to USDA specifications, includes "butter or other edible fat, broth, stock or water plus spices, flavor enhancers and other approved substances." This increases the moisture content in the meat however, it also masks the natural taste of the bird.


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